A Randomized Trial Comparing Parental Holding and Upright Positioning to Traditional Supine Positioning During IV Catheter Insertion in Young Children

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159996
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Randomized Trial Comparing Parental Holding and Upright Positioning to Traditional Supine Positioning During IV Catheter Insertion in Young Children
Abstract:
A Randomized Trial Comparing Parental Holding and Upright Positioning to Traditional Supine Positioning During IV Catheter Insertion in Young Children
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Sparks, Laurie, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Barnes-Jewish College of Nursing
Contact Address:Mailstop: 90-30-625, 306 S. Kingshighway, St. Louis, MO, 63146, USA
Co-Authors:J. Luhmann and J. Setlik, , St. Louis Children's Hospital, St. Louis, MO
Intravenous catheter (IV) insertions are common, stressful procedures for young children. Allowing parents to hold their child in an upright position during the procedure may reduce distress. This study compared the efficacy of parental holding/upright positioning to supine positioning in reducing distress in young children undergoing IV insertions. Children 9-months to 4-years (N=118) requiring an IV were randomly assigned to being held by a parent in an upright position or being held supine with the parent present. The procedures were videotaped and observers blinded to the study purpose rated the level of the children's distress using the Procedure Behavior Rating Scale (PBRS). The number of IV attempts and assessment of parental and nurse satisfaction with the procedure were also measured. The mean PRBS scores were lower for the upright group (6.5 compared to 9.4, p<0.0001) indicating less distress. Parents were more satisfied with the IV procedure when the child was held upright (p=0.03), and there was no significant difference in the number of IV attempts needed between the groups. However, nurses rated the upright position less satisfactory. Parental holding and upright positioning appear to reduce distress, increase parental satisfaction and not impact IV success. Nurses in this study, however, were less satisfied with the upright position. This may be due to the alteration in technique required by the change in patient position creating less confidence in the nurse's perception of their ability to be successful.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Randomized Trial Comparing Parental Holding and Upright Positioning to Traditional Supine Positioning During IV Catheter Insertion in Young Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159996-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Randomized Trial Comparing Parental Holding and Upright Positioning to Traditional Supine Positioning During IV Catheter Insertion in Young Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sparks, Laurie, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Barnes-Jewish College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Mailstop: 90-30-625, 306 S. Kingshighway, St. Louis, MO, 63146, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">las0880@bjc.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J. Luhmann and J. Setlik, , St. Louis Children's Hospital, St. Louis, MO</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Intravenous catheter (IV) insertions are common, stressful procedures for young children. Allowing parents to hold their child in an upright position during the procedure may reduce distress. This study compared the efficacy of parental holding/upright positioning to supine positioning in reducing distress in young children undergoing IV insertions. Children 9-months to 4-years (N=118) requiring an IV were randomly assigned to being held by a parent in an upright position or being held supine with the parent present. The procedures were videotaped and observers blinded to the study purpose rated the level of the children's distress using the Procedure Behavior Rating Scale (PBRS). The number of IV attempts and assessment of parental and nurse satisfaction with the procedure were also measured. The mean PRBS scores were lower for the upright group (6.5 compared to 9.4, p&lt;0.0001) indicating less distress. Parents were more satisfied with the IV procedure when the child was held upright (p=0.03), and there was no significant difference in the number of IV attempts needed between the groups. However, nurses rated the upright position less satisfactory. Parental holding and upright positioning appear to reduce distress, increase parental satisfaction and not impact IV success. Nurses in this study, however, were less satisfied with the upright position. This may be due to the alteration in technique required by the change in patient position creating less confidence in the nurse's perception of their ability to be successful.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:31:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:31:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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