2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160002
Type:
Presentation
Title:
What Disclosure and Criminal Background Checks Reveal About Nursing Students
Abstract:
What Disclosure and Criminal Background Checks Reveal About Nursing Students
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Todero, Catherine, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:San Diego State University
Contact Address:Hardy Tower 58C, 5500 Campanile Dr., San Diego, CA, 92182-4158, USA
Background: Nurses are held to high professional and personal standards and are consistently rated by the public as one of the most highly trusted professionals. Incidents of serious neglect, abuse or violence toward patients or their families could seriously shake the public trust. A good way to predict the risk of future inappropriate behaviors is to evaluate past behaviors. Historically this information has been obtained through applicant self disclosure. In recent years self-disclosure has been replaced by criminal background checks. Research Aims: 1. Examine the number and nature of self-disclosed events in a sample of students admitted to a nursing college. 2. Examine the number and nature of events revealed through background checks in a sub-sample of students admitted to a nursing college. 3. Determine the number and nature of discrepancies between self-disclosure and criminal background checks in this sample. Methods: There were 2154 disclosure statements examined on 2179 students admitted to a Midwestern university medical center over a seven year period from 1999-2006. Disclosure statements for 25 students were missing or could not be found. Criminal background checks were conducted on a sub-sample, N=685, of this group admitted from 2003-2006. Information reported on the admission disclosure forms and the information reported in the background check reports were compared to determine the level of agreement in what was self-reported and what was discovered on background check. Findings: Applicants were primarily Caucasian (92.4%) and female (93%) with an average age of 26.7 years. Overall, 163 students (7.6%) disclosed an incident; an additional 40 (1.9%) should have disclosed i.e. were dishonest and 14 (0.6%) committed incidents after the disclosure statements were solicited. Of those with incidents, 17.9% were multiple offenders. The majority of these offenses, 66.5%, were alcohol related. Knowledge of prior student convictions creates dilemmas for student clinical placements. Additional findings and implications for nursing education will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWhat Disclosure and Criminal Background Checks Reveal About Nursing Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160002-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">What Disclosure and Criminal Background Checks Reveal About Nursing Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Todero, Catherine, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">San Diego State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Hardy Tower 58C, 5500 Campanile Dr., San Diego, CA, 92182-4158, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ctodero@mail.sdsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Nurses are held to high professional and personal standards and are consistently rated by the public as one of the most highly trusted professionals. Incidents of serious neglect, abuse or violence toward patients or their families could seriously shake the public trust. A good way to predict the risk of future inappropriate behaviors is to evaluate past behaviors. Historically this information has been obtained through applicant self disclosure. In recent years self-disclosure has been replaced by criminal background checks. Research Aims: 1. Examine the number and nature of self-disclosed events in a sample of students admitted to a nursing college. 2. Examine the number and nature of events revealed through background checks in a sub-sample of students admitted to a nursing college. 3. Determine the number and nature of discrepancies between self-disclosure and criminal background checks in this sample. Methods: There were 2154 disclosure statements examined on 2179 students admitted to a Midwestern university medical center over a seven year period from 1999-2006. Disclosure statements for 25 students were missing or could not be found. Criminal background checks were conducted on a sub-sample, N=685, of this group admitted from 2003-2006. Information reported on the admission disclosure forms and the information reported in the background check reports were compared to determine the level of agreement in what was self-reported and what was discovered on background check. Findings: Applicants were primarily Caucasian (92.4%) and female (93%) with an average age of 26.7 years. Overall, 163 students (7.6%) disclosed an incident; an additional 40 (1.9%) should have disclosed i.e. were dishonest and 14 (0.6%) committed incidents after the disclosure statements were solicited. Of those with incidents, 17.9% were multiple offenders. The majority of these offenses, 66.5%, were alcohol related. Knowledge of prior student convictions creates dilemmas for student clinical placements. Additional findings and implications for nursing education will be discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:32:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:32:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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