The Effect of Prehabilitation Exercise Prior To Knee Arthroplasty on Readiness for Surgery

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160003
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of Prehabilitation Exercise Prior To Knee Arthroplasty on Readiness for Surgery
Abstract:
The Effect of Prehabilitation Exercise Prior To Knee Arthroplasty on Readiness for Surgery
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Topp, Robert, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Louisville
Contact Address:, Louisville, KY, 40292, USA
Co-Authors:P. Quesada, A. Swank, J. Nyland, A. Malkani, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY and D. Boardley, University of Toledo/Medical University of Ohio, Toledo, OH
Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) involves replacement of the diseased knee joint with a prosthetic device and commonly involves prolonged rehabilitation. Previous investigators have observed that patients who are better conditioned prior to TKA recover from the surgery faster. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of an 8-week prehabilitation intervention on measures of functional ability and nutritional status among patients scheduled for TKA. Subjects who were scheduled for TKA were randomized to an 8-week prehabilitation Exercise Group (EG) (n=28) or a usual care control group (CG) (n=28). Subjects in the EG participated in resistance exercises, stepping and balance exercises 3 times per week for 8 weeks prior to their TKA surgery. The subjects assigned to a Control Group (CG) received usual care for the eight weeks prior to their surgery. Prior to randomization and just prior to their TKA surgery, subjects were assessed for functional ability with a smaller subset of subjects being assessed for nutritional status. Assessments of functional ability included the distance covered in a 6-minute walk, the number of sit-to-stands in 30-seconds, the time required to ascend and descend a flight of 22 stairs. Nutritional status was assessed by collection of blood proteins as well as an analysis of a 3-day diet recall. ANCOVA using baseline scores as covariates was used to determine group differences in the outcome variables at the 8-week data collection point. The EG exhibited a 7% greater distance covered during the 6-minute walk (p=.041) and a 15% greater number of sit-to-stands (p=.023) when compared to the CG. The analysis of the subsample involving nutritional status demonstrated that neither group changed their total caloric or protein intake over the duration of the study. The EG (n=13) exhibited a significantly lower body weight (1.3 kg) and a significantly higher blood albumin (.25 g/dl) compared to the CG (n=12). Although not statistically significant, the EG exhibited faster times when descending and descending stairs and other measures of nutritional status compared to the CG. These preliminary findings indicate that a prehabilitation intervention may result in improved functional ability and nutritional status prior to TKA surgery.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of Prehabilitation Exercise Prior To Knee Arthroplasty on Readiness for Surgeryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160003-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effect of Prehabilitation Exercise Prior To Knee Arthroplasty on Readiness for Surgery</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Topp, Robert, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Louisville</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Louisville, KY, 40292, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rvtopp01@louisville.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">P. Quesada, A. Swank, J. Nyland, A. Malkani, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY and D. Boardley, University of Toledo/Medical University of Ohio, Toledo, OH</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) involves replacement of the diseased knee joint with a prosthetic device and commonly involves prolonged rehabilitation. Previous investigators have observed that patients who are better conditioned prior to TKA recover from the surgery faster. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of an 8-week prehabilitation intervention on measures of functional ability and nutritional status among patients scheduled for TKA. Subjects who were scheduled for TKA were randomized to an 8-week prehabilitation Exercise Group (EG) (n=28) or a usual care control group (CG) (n=28). Subjects in the EG participated in resistance exercises, stepping and balance exercises 3 times per week for 8 weeks prior to their TKA surgery. The subjects assigned to a Control Group (CG) received usual care for the eight weeks prior to their surgery. Prior to randomization and just prior to their TKA surgery, subjects were assessed for functional ability with a smaller subset of subjects being assessed for nutritional status. Assessments of functional ability included the distance covered in a 6-minute walk, the number of sit-to-stands in 30-seconds, the time required to ascend and descend a flight of 22 stairs. Nutritional status was assessed by collection of blood proteins as well as an analysis of a 3-day diet recall. ANCOVA using baseline scores as covariates was used to determine group differences in the outcome variables at the 8-week data collection point. The EG exhibited a 7% greater distance covered during the 6-minute walk (p=.041) and a 15% greater number of sit-to-stands (p=.023) when compared to the CG. The analysis of the subsample involving nutritional status demonstrated that neither group changed their total caloric or protein intake over the duration of the study. The EG (n=13) exhibited a significantly lower body weight (1.3 kg) and a significantly higher blood albumin (.25 g/dl) compared to the CG (n=12). Although not statistically significant, the EG exhibited faster times when descending and descending stairs and other measures of nutritional status compared to the CG. These preliminary findings indicate that a prehabilitation intervention may result in improved functional ability and nutritional status prior to TKA surgery.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:32:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:32:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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