Centering Pregnancy: Improving Maternal-Child Health Through Group Visit Prenatal Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160006
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Centering Pregnancy: Improving Maternal-Child Health Through Group Visit Prenatal Care
Abstract:
Centering Pregnancy: Improving Maternal-Child Health Through Group Visit Prenatal Care
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Vonderheid, Susan, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Contact Address:m/c 802 room 840, 845 S. Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Co-Authors:C. Klima and K. Norr, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL and A. Handler, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
Significance: Substantial disparities in low birth weight and infant mortality in the U.S. partly reflect a standard of prenatal care (PNC) that has failed to address these and other adverse perinatal outcomes. Disparities are especially problematic for African-American (AA) women who enter PNC later, receive less health promotion content; and have 2-3 times the national rates of infant mortality, prematurity, and low birth weight. Thus, AA women will especially benefit from innovative PNC. Centering Pregnancy(R) (CP) is an innovative model of PNC that replaces the individual visit model with a group visit model and bundles support services (e.g., lactation consulting) for medically low-risk pregnant women. Objective: This study examines the effects of CP on maternal and infant outcomes compared to individual PNC. Conceptual Framework: Essential Elements of Centering Pregnancy(R). Sample: African-American low-income pregnant women receiving care in a public health clinic in a large midwestern city. Methods: This pilot study compares women receiving CP (n= 62) and individual care (IC, n=134) from midwives using structured interviews, chart reviews and focus groups. Results: Preliminary results show that women in CP were highly satisfied with their care and had outcomes equivalent or better than the comparison group: CP women had higher birth weight infants (3292 vs. 3142 grams) and lower rates of low birth weight infants (7.3% vs 8.3%). Trends showed that CP women had higher maternal weight gain (31 vs. 29 pounds), longer gestational age (39.3 vs. 38.6), higher breastfeeding rates (40% vs. 30%), and lower prematurity rates (5.6% vs. 11.2%). Conclusions and Recommendations: Results show CP is a highly promising model of PNC for women at risk of adverse outcomes related to sociodemographic factors. Large randomized controlled trials are needed to more fully examine the effects of CP on outcomes, the fidelity of implementing CP, and the pathways through which CP might affect maternal and child outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCentering Pregnancy: Improving Maternal-Child Health Through Group Visit Prenatal Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160006-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Centering Pregnancy: Improving Maternal-Child Health Through Group Visit Prenatal Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Vonderheid, Susan, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">m/c 802 room 840, 845 S. Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vonde@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C. Klima and K. Norr, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL and A. Handler, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Significance: Substantial disparities in low birth weight and infant mortality in the U.S. partly reflect a standard of prenatal care (PNC) that has failed to address these and other adverse perinatal outcomes. Disparities are especially problematic for African-American (AA) women who enter PNC later, receive less health promotion content; and have 2-3 times the national rates of infant mortality, prematurity, and low birth weight. Thus, AA women will especially benefit from innovative PNC. Centering Pregnancy(R) (CP) is an innovative model of PNC that replaces the individual visit model with a group visit model and bundles support services (e.g., lactation consulting) for medically low-risk pregnant women. Objective: This study examines the effects of CP on maternal and infant outcomes compared to individual PNC. Conceptual Framework: Essential Elements of Centering Pregnancy(R). Sample: African-American low-income pregnant women receiving care in a public health clinic in a large midwestern city. Methods: This pilot study compares women receiving CP (n= 62) and individual care (IC, n=134) from midwives using structured interviews, chart reviews and focus groups. Results: Preliminary results show that women in CP were highly satisfied with their care and had outcomes equivalent or better than the comparison group: CP women had higher birth weight infants (3292 vs. 3142 grams) and lower rates of low birth weight infants (7.3% vs 8.3%). Trends showed that CP women had higher maternal weight gain (31 vs. 29 pounds), longer gestational age (39.3 vs. 38.6), higher breastfeeding rates (40% vs. 30%), and lower prematurity rates (5.6% vs. 11.2%). Conclusions and Recommendations: Results show CP is a highly promising model of PNC for women at risk of adverse outcomes related to sociodemographic factors. Large randomized controlled trials are needed to more fully examine the effects of CP on outcomes, the fidelity of implementing CP, and the pathways through which CP might affect maternal and child outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:32:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:32:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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