2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160008
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Salivary Oxytocin Levels in Lactating Women
Abstract:
Salivary Oxytocin Levels in Lactating Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:White-Traut, Rosemary, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:UIC - Room 806
Contact Address:Maternal/Child Nursing, 845 South Damen, Chicago, IL, 60521, USA
Co-Authors:S. Carter and K. Watanabe, Maternal/Child Nursing, UIC, Chicago, IL and S. Carter, Psychiatry, UIC, Chicago, IA
Oxytocin is a neuropeptide with influences on many physiological and social functions including labor and birth, lactation, sexual behavior, nurturing maternal behaviors, and reduction of stress. However, our understanding of its role has been hampered by the lack of a validated non invasive oxytocin assay. The purpose of this research was to determine whether oxytocin can be reliably detected in saliva; identify whether breast feeding elicits a pattern in salivary oxytocin levels; and determine whether oxytocin has a circadian rhythm. A prospective repeated measures design was employed. Eleven research participants provided 18 saliva samples during three breast feeding cycles (before, at initiation and after breast feeding) for two 24-hour data collection cycles (Day 1 or Day 2). Within each 24-hour data collection cycle, there were three sample collection sessions: a late evening feeding, an early morning feeding, and a late morning feeding (Time of Feeding). Oxytocin, measured via salivary enzyme immunoassay (concentrated, X-fold), ranged from 6.44 to 61.05 pg/ml and showed a similar repeating pattern between days and across each breast feeding cycle. Significant differences were identified across the breast feeding cycle between the 30 minutes before vs initiation of feeding and between before vs 30 minutes after feeding. The final analysis considered the three breast feeding cycles with Time of Day and Days 1 and 2 combined. Oxytocin level was the highest 30-minutes before each feeding (M = 38.42, SD = 8.36), t (9) = 7.662, p< 0.017 (two-tailed); followed by a decrease at the initiation of feeding (M = 16.60, SD = 4.18), t (9) = -3.272, p< 0.017 (two-tailed); and an increase at 30-minutes after the feeding (M = 23.21, SD = 5.08), t (9) =10.853, p< 0.017 (two-tailed). This is the first research demonstrating that oxytocin can be reliably measured in saliva via enzyme immunoassay. The findings suggest that oxytocin increased in anticipation of feedings yet revealed no influence of a circadian rhythm on oxytocin levels. The validation of a reliable salivary oxytocin assay will support future research on women's health, lactation, mother-infant interaction, and other psychological disorders.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSalivary Oxytocin Levels in Lactating Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160008-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Salivary Oxytocin Levels in Lactating Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">White-Traut, Rosemary, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">UIC - Room 806</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Maternal/Child Nursing, 845 South Damen, Chicago, IL, 60521, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rwt@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S. Carter and K. Watanabe, Maternal/Child Nursing, UIC, Chicago, IL and S. Carter, Psychiatry, UIC, Chicago, IA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Oxytocin is a neuropeptide with influences on many physiological and social functions including labor and birth, lactation, sexual behavior, nurturing maternal behaviors, and reduction of stress. However, our understanding of its role has been hampered by the lack of a validated non invasive oxytocin assay. The purpose of this research was to determine whether oxytocin can be reliably detected in saliva; identify whether breast feeding elicits a pattern in salivary oxytocin levels; and determine whether oxytocin has a circadian rhythm. A prospective repeated measures design was employed. Eleven research participants provided 18 saliva samples during three breast feeding cycles (before, at initiation and after breast feeding) for two 24-hour data collection cycles (Day 1 or Day 2). Within each 24-hour data collection cycle, there were three sample collection sessions: a late evening feeding, an early morning feeding, and a late morning feeding (Time of Feeding). Oxytocin, measured via salivary enzyme immunoassay (concentrated, X-fold), ranged from 6.44 to 61.05 pg/ml and showed a similar repeating pattern between days and across each breast feeding cycle. Significant differences were identified across the breast feeding cycle between the 30 minutes before vs initiation of feeding and between before vs 30 minutes after feeding. The final analysis considered the three breast feeding cycles with Time of Day and Days 1 and 2 combined. Oxytocin level was the highest 30-minutes before each feeding (M = 38.42, SD = 8.36), t (9) = 7.662, p&lt; 0.017 (two-tailed); followed by a decrease at the initiation of feeding (M = 16.60, SD = 4.18), t (9) = -3.272, p&lt; 0.017 (two-tailed); and an increase at 30-minutes after the feeding (M = 23.21, SD = 5.08), t (9) =10.853, p&lt; 0.017 (two-tailed). This is the first research demonstrating that oxytocin can be reliably measured in saliva via enzyme immunoassay. The findings suggest that oxytocin increased in anticipation of feedings yet revealed no influence of a circadian rhythm on oxytocin levels. The validation of a reliable salivary oxytocin assay will support future research on women's health, lactation, mother-infant interaction, and other psychological disorders.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:32:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:32:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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