Motivational Interviewing to Promote Sustained Breastfeeding (Native American Women)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160009
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Motivational Interviewing to Promote Sustained Breastfeeding (Native American Women)
Abstract:
Motivational Interviewing to Promote Sustained Breastfeeding (Native American Women)
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Wilhelm, Susan, RNC, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:UNMC
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Scottsbluff, NE, 82240, USA
Co-Authors:T. Rodehorst, College of Nursing, UNMC, Scottsbluff, NE and M. Flanders-Stepans, School of Nursing, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY
The incidence of asthma, the most common serious chronic inflammatory disease among children, is rising each year. Therefore nursing interventions aimed at promoting infant immunity and mitigating factors to which the infant may be exposed may reduce the complications of this chronic illness. Breastfeeding is an ideal initial prevention strategy that strengthens the infant's immune system. In addition, the identification of biomarkers that reflect infant immune response sets the stage for the evaluation of nursing interventions targeted to decrease the impact of this chronic inflammatory disease. Although more mothers currently initiate breastfeeding, they do not sustain breastfeeding for the recommended 6 to 12 months. In general, Native American mothers' breastfeed for a shorter period of time and have fewer resources to support breastfeeding. This pilot study will: 1. Evaluate the cultural appropriateness of an intervention protocol: a) motivational interviewing technique; b) stool, urine, and breast milk sample collection; and c) infant breastfeeding test weights. 2. Compare motivational interviewing with an attention intervention (infant safety) on: a) breastfeeding self-efficacy, b) intended length of breastfeeding, and c) duration of breastfeeding. 3. Examine urine samples of infants for the presence of the inflammatory cytokine (LTE4) and evaluate infant fecal and breast milk samples for human milk oligosaccharide levels. A two-group design with repeated measures was selected to study a convenience sample of 60 breastfeeding Native American mothers recruited from two Northern Plains Tribal sites in order to control for 20% attrition rate. The participants will be assigned to either the Motivational Interviewing (MI) or the attention intervention (AI) group depending on their reservation. If mothers in the MI intervention group breastfeed longer than mothers in the AI group and are shown to have greater breastfeeding self efficacy, then MI may be useful as a strategy to test in a comprehensive intervention plan designed to promote breastfeeding in rural Native American women to enhance infant respiratory health. If biomarkers of the immune response can be measured in infants, then the effectiveness of future interventions can be evaluated.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMotivational Interviewing to Promote Sustained Breastfeeding (Native American Women)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160009-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Motivational Interviewing to Promote Sustained Breastfeeding (Native American Women)</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wilhelm, Susan, RNC, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">UNMC</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Scottsbluff, NE, 82240, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">slwilhel@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">T. Rodehorst, College of Nursing, UNMC, Scottsbluff, NE and M. Flanders-Stepans, School of Nursing, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The incidence of asthma, the most common serious chronic inflammatory disease among children, is rising each year. Therefore nursing interventions aimed at promoting infant immunity and mitigating factors to which the infant may be exposed may reduce the complications of this chronic illness. Breastfeeding is an ideal initial prevention strategy that strengthens the infant's immune system. In addition, the identification of biomarkers that reflect infant immune response sets the stage for the evaluation of nursing interventions targeted to decrease the impact of this chronic inflammatory disease. Although more mothers currently initiate breastfeeding, they do not sustain breastfeeding for the recommended 6 to 12 months. In general, Native American mothers' breastfeed for a shorter period of time and have fewer resources to support breastfeeding. This pilot study will: 1. Evaluate the cultural appropriateness of an intervention protocol: a) motivational interviewing technique; b) stool, urine, and breast milk sample collection; and c) infant breastfeeding test weights. 2. Compare motivational interviewing with an attention intervention (infant safety) on: a) breastfeeding self-efficacy, b) intended length of breastfeeding, and c) duration of breastfeeding. 3. Examine urine samples of infants for the presence of the inflammatory cytokine (LTE4) and evaluate infant fecal and breast milk samples for human milk oligosaccharide levels. A two-group design with repeated measures was selected to study a convenience sample of 60 breastfeeding Native American mothers recruited from two Northern Plains Tribal sites in order to control for 20% attrition rate. The participants will be assigned to either the Motivational Interviewing (MI) or the attention intervention (AI) group depending on their reservation. If mothers in the MI intervention group breastfeed longer than mothers in the AI group and are shown to have greater breastfeeding self efficacy, then MI may be useful as a strategy to test in a comprehensive intervention plan designed to promote breastfeeding in rural Native American women to enhance infant respiratory health. If biomarkers of the immune response can be measured in infants, then the effectiveness of future interventions can be evaluated.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:32:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:32:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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