Promoting Cognition and Function Through Aerobic Exercise in Older Adults with Alzheimer Disease

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160013
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Promoting Cognition and Function Through Aerobic Exercise in Older Adults with Alzheimer Disease
Abstract:
Promoting Cognition and Function Through Aerobic Exercise in Older Adults with Alzheimer Disease
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Yu, Fang, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Contact Address:SON 5-160 WDH 1331, 308 Harvard St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Co-Authors:A. Kolanowski, SON, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park; N. Strumpf, SON, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; and P. Eslinger, Dept. of Neurology, The Pennsylvania State University, Hershey
Purpose: Currently 4.5 million Americans have Alzheimer disease (AD), and this number will increase to 14 million by 2050. Functional decline is prevalent in this population and contributes to many poor health outcomes. Although functional decline has been recognized as essential for the dementia diagnosis, it is still unclear what cognitive domains contribute to functional decline. The purpose of this integrative review is to analyze the impact of cognition on function and to explore the potential of aerobic exercise for promoting cognitive and functional capacities. Organizing Construct: The organizing construct for this review is the relationship between cognition and functional decline in persons with AD. Methods: Studies were selected based on an extensive search of electronic databases and manual cross-referencing for the period 1980 to 2006, using the combination of keywords AD, dementia, or cognitive impairment with function or activities of daily living. Findings: Three broad themes emerged from the literature analysis. First, global cognition has mainly been used to examine the impact of cognition on function, which suggests that functional decline proceeds in a hierarchical fashion. However, global cognition is limiting since it does not reflect individual variation in cognitive impairment and is not a good target for interventions. Second, specific cognitive domains are more important for understanding functional decline. Executive functioning has emerged as a strong predictor for functional decline and may even mediate the impact of memory on functional decline. Last, aerobic exercise may promote cognition and function in older adults with AD by modifying AD neuropathological changes. Conclusions: Specific cognitive domains such as executive functioning are essential for understanding function in persons with AD, which are potentially modifiable by aerobic exercise. Keywords: Function, Activities of Daily Living, Cognition, Dementia, and Exercise.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePromoting Cognition and Function Through Aerobic Exercise in Older Adults with Alzheimer Diseaseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160013-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Promoting Cognition and Function Through Aerobic Exercise in Older Adults with Alzheimer Disease</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Yu, Fang, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON 5-160 WDH 1331, 308 Harvard St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">yuxxx244@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">A. Kolanowski, SON, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park; N. Strumpf, SON, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; and P. Eslinger, Dept. of Neurology, The Pennsylvania State University, Hershey</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Currently 4.5 million Americans have Alzheimer disease (AD), and this number will increase to 14 million by 2050. Functional decline is prevalent in this population and contributes to many poor health outcomes. Although functional decline has been recognized as essential for the dementia diagnosis, it is still unclear what cognitive domains contribute to functional decline. The purpose of this integrative review is to analyze the impact of cognition on function and to explore the potential of aerobic exercise for promoting cognitive and functional capacities. Organizing Construct: The organizing construct for this review is the relationship between cognition and functional decline in persons with AD. Methods: Studies were selected based on an extensive search of electronic databases and manual cross-referencing for the period 1980 to 2006, using the combination of keywords AD, dementia, or cognitive impairment with function or activities of daily living. Findings: Three broad themes emerged from the literature analysis. First, global cognition has mainly been used to examine the impact of cognition on function, which suggests that functional decline proceeds in a hierarchical fashion. However, global cognition is limiting since it does not reflect individual variation in cognitive impairment and is not a good target for interventions. Second, specific cognitive domains are more important for understanding functional decline. Executive functioning has emerged as a strong predictor for functional decline and may even mediate the impact of memory on functional decline. Last, aerobic exercise may promote cognition and function in older adults with AD by modifying AD neuropathological changes. Conclusions: Specific cognitive domains such as executive functioning are essential for understanding function in persons with AD, which are potentially modifiable by aerobic exercise. Keywords: Function, Activities of Daily Living, Cognition, Dementia, and Exercise.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:32:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:32:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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