2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160014
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Korean and American Music for Postoperative Pain
Abstract:
Korean and American Music for Postoperative Pain
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Ahn, Sukhee, PhD, RN, WHNPC
P.I. Institution Name:Pusan National University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1-10 Ami-dong Seo-gu, Pusan, 602-739, South Korea
Contact Telephone:82 51 240 7755
Co-Authors:Marion Good, PhD, FAAN, Professor
Studies show that music reduced postoperative pain in the US, but culturally-relevant tests of music for postoperative pain are needed in Korea. Using the Good and Moore theory of multimodal pain management and an experimental pretest-posttest design, 73 women were randomly assigned before GYN surgery; 47% to the music group and 53% to the control group. The music group chose among 5 types of music: 3 previously selected by Korean women postoperatively (ballads, religious and popular songs) and 2 selected by an American researcher (soft, slow piano and orchestra music). Analgesics by physician order were delivered by: patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) (59%) or intravenous/intramuscular (IV/IM) injection (41%), which did not result in significantly different pain. After listening to an excerpt of each music type, the majority (62%) in the music group chose Korean-selected music and 38% chose American-selected music. Chosen music was heard during 15 minutes of rest, am and pm on postoperative days 1 and 2. The control group rested for 15 minutes. Pain was measured with sensation and distress VAS. Using MANCOVA, controlling for pretest pain, the music group had significantly less posttest pain on both days, afternoon only, resulting in 26% and 27% less pain than analgesics alone. There was no posttest difference in pain between those who chose Korean-selected music or American-selected music. If Korean music had not been offered, the majority would have been treated with a less-than-preferred type of music, yet American music was effective for Koreans women who preferred it. Nurses should offer choice and culturally congruent choices with Koreans who are patients in Korea or in other countries.

Supported by an Ohio Board of Regents Research Infrastructure Grant provided by FPB School of Nursing.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleKorean and American Music for Postoperative Painen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160014-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Korean and American Music for Postoperative Pain</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ahn, Sukhee, PhD, RN, WHNPC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Pusan National University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1-10 Ami-dong Seo-gu, Pusan, 602-739, South Korea</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">82 51 240 7755</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sukheeahn@pusan.ac.kr</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marion Good, PhD, FAAN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Studies show that music reduced postoperative pain in the US, but culturally-relevant tests of music for postoperative pain are needed in Korea. Using the Good and Moore theory of multimodal pain management and an experimental pretest-posttest design, 73 women were randomly assigned before GYN surgery; 47% to the music group and 53% to the control group. The music group chose among 5 types of music: 3 previously selected by Korean women postoperatively (ballads, religious and popular songs) and 2 selected by an American researcher (soft, slow piano and orchestra music). Analgesics by physician order were delivered by: patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) (59%) or intravenous/intramuscular (IV/IM) injection (41%), which did not result in significantly different pain. After listening to an excerpt of each music type, the majority (62%) in the music group chose Korean-selected music and 38% chose American-selected music. Chosen music was heard during 15 minutes of rest, am and pm on postoperative days 1 and 2. The control group rested for 15 minutes. Pain was measured with sensation and distress VAS. Using MANCOVA, controlling for pretest pain, the music group had significantly less posttest pain on both days, afternoon only, resulting in 26% and 27% less pain than analgesics alone. There was no posttest difference in pain between those who chose Korean-selected music or American-selected music. If Korean music had not been offered, the majority would have been treated with a less-than-preferred type of music, yet American music was effective for Koreans women who preferred it. Nurses should offer choice and culturally congruent choices with Koreans who are patients in Korea or in other countries.<br/><br/>Supported by an Ohio Board of Regents Research Infrastructure Grant provided by FPB School of Nursing.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:32:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:32:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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