The Relationship Between Emotional Distress and the Symptom Experience following Traumatic Brain Injury

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160017
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship Between Emotional Distress and the Symptom Experience following Traumatic Brain Injury
Abstract:
The Relationship Between Emotional Distress and the Symptom Experience following Traumatic Brain Injury
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Bergman, Karen, BSN, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:MI State University
Title:Predoctoral Student
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Life Science Building, A211, E. Lansing, MI, 48824-1317, USA
Contact Telephone:517 3538681
Co-Authors:Esther Bay, PhD, MSN, BSN, APN, Assistant Professor
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects 1.5 million Americans annually and can lead to profound disability with lifelong consequences affecting mood, behavior, cognition and physical health. Disability after mild-to-moderate brain injury is associated with difficulties in activities of daily living, interpersonal relationships and return to pre-injury work status. The purpose of this study is to examine relationships between brain injury symptom frequency and emotional distress using the UCSF symptom management framework among a group of community-dwelling mild-to-moderate survivors (n=75) of brain injury who were recruited from specialty clinics and are within 2 years of their date of injury. Results of this study indicate that there is a significant and positive relationship between symptom frequency and time-since-injury. Those with milder injuries reported significantly greater symptom frequency. There is a significant and positive relationship between brain injury symptom frequency and tension/anxiety for tension/anxiety explaining 40% of the variance in post-injury symptom frequency reporting ( R2 =.40, p=.000). There is a significant and positive relationship between brain injury symptoms and anger/hostility, with those younger or male reporting significantly greater moods of anger/hostility in relationship to symptom frequency (R2 =.32, p=.000). There is a significant and positive relationship between brain injury symptom frequency and perceived stress, with perceived stress explaining 51% of the variance in symptom frequency (R2 =.51, p=.000) Nurses are often the most frequent healthcare contact for patients after traumatic injury and are appropriate providers to asses and understand the symptom experience. Based on these results, one could speculate that emotional distress, if present, would limit social relationships and work abilities. Thus it is critical that the symptom experience be realized and efforts made to reduce the frequency and intensity of the symptoms through appropriate management strategies.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationship Between Emotional Distress and the Symptom Experience following Traumatic Brain Injuryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160017-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Relationship Between Emotional Distress and the Symptom Experience following Traumatic Brain Injury</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bergman, Karen, BSN, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">MI State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Predoctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Life Science Building, A211, E. Lansing, MI, 48824-1317, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">517 3538681</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ksbergman@aol.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Esther Bay, PhD, MSN, BSN, APN, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects 1.5 million Americans annually and can lead to profound disability with lifelong consequences affecting mood, behavior, cognition and physical health. Disability after mild-to-moderate brain injury is associated with difficulties in activities of daily living, interpersonal relationships and return to pre-injury work status. The purpose of this study is to examine relationships between brain injury symptom frequency and emotional distress using the UCSF symptom management framework among a group of community-dwelling mild-to-moderate survivors (n=75) of brain injury who were recruited from specialty clinics and are within 2 years of their date of injury. Results of this study indicate that there is a significant and positive relationship between symptom frequency and time-since-injury. Those with milder injuries reported significantly greater symptom frequency. There is a significant and positive relationship between brain injury symptom frequency and tension/anxiety for tension/anxiety explaining 40% of the variance in post-injury symptom frequency reporting ( R2 =.40, p=.000). There is a significant and positive relationship between brain injury symptoms and anger/hostility, with those younger or male reporting significantly greater moods of anger/hostility in relationship to symptom frequency (R2 =.32, p=.000). There is a significant and positive relationship between brain injury symptom frequency and perceived stress, with perceived stress explaining 51% of the variance in symptom frequency (R2 =.51, p=.000) Nurses are often the most frequent healthcare contact for patients after traumatic injury and are appropriate providers to asses and understand the symptom experience. Based on these results, one could speculate that emotional distress, if present, would limit social relationships and work abilities. Thus it is critical that the symptom experience be realized and efforts made to reduce the frequency and intensity of the symptoms through appropriate management strategies.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:32:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:32:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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