2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160023
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of Preoperative Warming on Unplanned Postoperative Hypothermia
Abstract:
Impact of Preoperative Warming on Unplanned Postoperative Hypothermia
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Buchman, Debra, PhD, RN, CNS
P.I. Institution Name:Medical University of Ohio
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 6012 Hawthorne Dr., Sylvania, OH, 43560, USA
Contact Telephone:419 383-6736
Unplanned perioperative hypothermia, a core temperature less than 36 degrees Centigrade (ASPAN, 2002), is a potentially dangerous complication of surgery affecting as many as 85% of all surgical patients (Ensminger & Moss, 1999; Stewart, Lujan, & Ruff, 1987; Vogelsang, 1991). Currently, a variety of treatments are used to prevent unplanned perioperative hypothermia; however, the most effective treatment has not been clearly identified. The purpose of the study was to compare the effects of pre-operative use of the forced air warming blanket to routine thermal care on the incidence of hypothermia and on the length of time required to return to normothermia after surgery. Kolcaba's Theory of Comfort was used as the framework for this study. Using a retrospective chart review, data was collected from a convenience sample of 53 patients undergoing major abdominal or orthopedic procedures with general anesthesia. The warmed group included patients who received forced air warming during the pre- and intra-operative periods and the unwarmed group included patients who received routine thermal care during the pre- and intra-operative periods, excluding forced air warming. Results from a repeated measures ANOVA with temperature as the within subjects factor measured pre-operatively, at PACU admission, and post-operatively and treatment group as the between subjects factor revealed that there was a significant difference between the mean temperatures but no significant difference in mean temperatures between the warmed and unwarmed groups. Post hoc paired sample t-tests with a Bonferroni adjustment demonstrated significant differences between each of the three pairs of temperatures. An independent samples t-test was done to determine if there was a significant difference in the mean time to normothermia after surgery between the warmed (M = 45.71, SD = 55.85) and unwarmed groups (M = 82.40, SD = 97.59). The results approached significance [t(32) = -1.265, p = .10]. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of Preoperative Warming on Unplanned Postoperative Hypothermiaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160023-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Impact of Preoperative Warming on Unplanned Postoperative Hypothermia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Buchman, Debra, PhD, RN, CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Medical University of Ohio</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 6012 Hawthorne Dr., Sylvania, OH, 43560, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">419 383-6736</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dbuchman@meduohio.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Unplanned perioperative hypothermia, a core temperature less than 36 degrees Centigrade (ASPAN, 2002), is a potentially dangerous complication of surgery affecting as many as 85% of all surgical patients (Ensminger &amp; Moss, 1999; Stewart, Lujan, &amp; Ruff, 1987; Vogelsang, 1991). Currently, a variety of treatments are used to prevent unplanned perioperative hypothermia; however, the most effective treatment has not been clearly identified. The purpose of the study was to compare the effects of pre-operative use of the forced air warming blanket to routine thermal care on the incidence of hypothermia and on the length of time required to return to normothermia after surgery. Kolcaba's Theory of Comfort was used as the framework for this study. Using a retrospective chart review, data was collected from a convenience sample of 53 patients undergoing major abdominal or orthopedic procedures with general anesthesia. The warmed group included patients who received forced air warming during the pre- and intra-operative periods and the unwarmed group included patients who received routine thermal care during the pre- and intra-operative periods, excluding forced air warming. Results from a repeated measures ANOVA with temperature as the within subjects factor measured pre-operatively, at PACU admission, and post-operatively and treatment group as the between subjects factor revealed that there was a significant difference between the mean temperatures but no significant difference in mean temperatures between the warmed and unwarmed groups. Post hoc paired sample t-tests with a Bonferroni adjustment demonstrated significant differences between each of the three pairs of temperatures. An independent samples t-test was done to determine if there was a significant difference in the mean time to normothermia after surgery between the warmed (M = 45.71, SD = 55.85) and unwarmed groups (M = 82.40, SD = 97.59). The results approached significance [t(32) = -1.265, p = .10]. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:33:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:33:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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