The Effects of a Tripartite Intervention on Physical and Cognitive Functioning of Persons with Dementia

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160024
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of a Tripartite Intervention on Physical and Cognitive Functioning of Persons with Dementia
Abstract:
The Effects of a Tripartite Intervention on Physical and Cognitive Functioning of Persons with Dementia
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Burgener, Sandy, PhD, GNP, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 408 S. Goodwin Street, Urbana, IL, 61801, USA
Contact Telephone:217 - 333-3083
Co-Authors:Yang Yang, PhD¬
Systematic studies are lacking that demonstrate the effects of interventions on broad outcomes in persons with dementia (PWD). Using brain plasticity theory as a basis for the interventions, this study purpose is to test the effectiveness of a tripartite intervention on overall functioning in PWD. The tested intervention includes: 1) Taiji exercises focusing on strength, balance, and fall prevention; 2) Cognitive-behavioral therapies addressing memory, social functioning, and mental and emotional well-being; and 3) Support group participation addressing socialization and self-esteem. PWD willing to commit to at least a 20-week intervention were randomized into either the treatment (n=24) or comparison (n=18, wait) group. Criteria for participation of the PWD include: 1) a confirmed, recent (within one year) diagnosis of irreversible dementia (Alzheimer, Lewy Body, vascular, frontal lobe, or mixed dementia); and 2) a score < 2.0 on the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale indicating an early to early-middle disease stage. Outcome variables include: muscle strength, balance, fear of falling and actual falls, cognitive functioning, self-esteem, sleep quality, physical illness, activity participation, and depression. The two groups did not vary on any demographic or outcome variable on the baseline assessment, indicating equivalence of the groups. After the 20-week intervention, treatment group participants evidenced increased cognitive functioning (MMSE: treatment: 50% increased scores, mean: +1.2; wait: 15% increased scores, mean: -.8), physical functioning (single leg stance: treatment: +6.2 seconds, wait: -1.8 seconds; single leg stance, eyes closed: treatment: +2.3, wait: +.2) increased self-esteem (Rosenberg's Self-Esteem: treatment: +1.45; wait: -3.0), and stability in depression (Geriatric Depression Scale: treatment: +.3; wait: +1.2). Fear of falling, sleep quality, physical illness, and activity participation were stable in the treatment group, with some decline (not significant) evidenced in the wait group. These initial findings support the intervention's effectiveness and testing of the intervention in a larger study.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of a Tripartite Intervention on Physical and Cognitive Functioning of Persons with Dementiaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160024-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects of a Tripartite Intervention on Physical and Cognitive Functioning of Persons with Dementia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Burgener, Sandy, PhD, GNP, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 408 S. Goodwin Street, Urbana, IL, 61801, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">217 - 333-3083</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sburgenr@uiuc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Yang Yang, PhD&not;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Systematic studies are lacking that demonstrate the effects of interventions on broad outcomes in persons with dementia (PWD). Using brain plasticity theory as a basis for the interventions, this study purpose is to test the effectiveness of a tripartite intervention on overall functioning in PWD. The tested intervention includes: 1) Taiji exercises focusing on strength, balance, and fall prevention; 2) Cognitive-behavioral therapies addressing memory, social functioning, and mental and emotional well-being; and 3) Support group participation addressing socialization and self-esteem. PWD willing to commit to at least a 20-week intervention were randomized into either the treatment (n=24) or comparison (n=18, wait) group. Criteria for participation of the PWD include: 1) a confirmed, recent (within one year) diagnosis of irreversible dementia (Alzheimer, Lewy Body, vascular, frontal lobe, or mixed dementia); and 2) a score &lt; 2.0 on the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale indicating an early to early-middle disease stage. Outcome variables include: muscle strength, balance, fear of falling and actual falls, cognitive functioning, self-esteem, sleep quality, physical illness, activity participation, and depression. The two groups did not vary on any demographic or outcome variable on the baseline assessment, indicating equivalence of the groups. After the 20-week intervention, treatment group participants evidenced increased cognitive functioning (MMSE: treatment: 50% increased scores, mean: +1.2; wait: 15% increased scores, mean: -.8), physical functioning (single leg stance: treatment: +6.2 seconds, wait: -1.8 seconds; single leg stance, eyes closed: treatment: +2.3, wait: +.2) increased self-esteem (Rosenberg's Self-Esteem: treatment: +1.45; wait: -3.0), and stability in depression (Geriatric Depression Scale: treatment: +.3; wait: +1.2). Fear of falling, sleep quality, physical illness, and activity participation were stable in the treatment group, with some decline (not significant) evidenced in the wait group. These initial findings support the intervention's effectiveness and testing of the intervention in a larger study.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:33:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:33:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.