2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160025
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Living with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Bodily Responses to Illness
Abstract:
Living with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Bodily Responses to Illness
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Burger, Jeri, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Southern Indiana
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 8600 University Blvd - HP 2131, Evansville, IN, 47712, USA
Contact Telephone:812 461-5340
The purpose of this interpretive study was to understand how persons live with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The study drew on the phenomenological understanding of the body in health and illness and nursing scholarship on embodiment. A convenience sample included 8 adults with either Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Data collection consisted of three semi-structured interviews with each participant over a 4 to 8 month period. The first interview elicited the participant's understanding of the illness. Two subsequent interviews asked participants to provide detailed accounts of recent meaningful and difficult situations in living with IBD. Three interpretive strategies were used to analyze the data: thematic analysis, identification of exemplars, and identification of paradigm cases. Bodily response to illness was one theme which emerged from the data. By listening to the body, the participant became familiar with his or her particular symptoms so that over time, the illness was incorporated as part of the person and was no longer an alien presence. Listening to the body influenced the participants' responses to illness-related disruptions. Development of body listening skills allowed participants to more skillfully respond to IBD. With experience, some participants developed a habitual skilled body which allowed the illness and the body to recede into the background, freeing the person to be engaged in the world. This study indicates that health care professionals need to promote the development of body listening to assist patients to more skillfully manage illness. It also supports the need for health care providers to listen to their patients with IBD and acknowledge the patients' bodily knowledge and practical expertise in illness management. Further research is needed to explore the development of skilled bodily responses to IBD.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLiving with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Bodily Responses to Illnessen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160025-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Living with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Bodily Responses to Illness</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Burger, Jeri, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Southern Indiana</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 8600 University Blvd - HP 2131, Evansville, IN, 47712, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">812 461-5340</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jlburger2@usi.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this interpretive study was to understand how persons live with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The study drew on the phenomenological understanding of the body in health and illness and nursing scholarship on embodiment. A convenience sample included 8 adults with either Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Data collection consisted of three semi-structured interviews with each participant over a 4 to 8 month period. The first interview elicited the participant's understanding of the illness. Two subsequent interviews asked participants to provide detailed accounts of recent meaningful and difficult situations in living with IBD. Three interpretive strategies were used to analyze the data: thematic analysis, identification of exemplars, and identification of paradigm cases. Bodily response to illness was one theme which emerged from the data. By listening to the body, the participant became familiar with his or her particular symptoms so that over time, the illness was incorporated as part of the person and was no longer an alien presence. Listening to the body influenced the participants' responses to illness-related disruptions. Development of body listening skills allowed participants to more skillfully respond to IBD. With experience, some participants developed a habitual skilled body which allowed the illness and the body to recede into the background, freeing the person to be engaged in the world. This study indicates that health care professionals need to promote the development of body listening to assist patients to more skillfully manage illness. It also supports the need for health care providers to listen to their patients with IBD and acknowledge the patients' bodily knowledge and practical expertise in illness management. Further research is needed to explore the development of skilled bodily responses to IBD.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:33:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:33:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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