2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160028
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adolescent Risky Behaviors and Alcohol Use
Abstract:
Adolescent Risky Behaviors and Alcohol Use
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Calvert, Wilma, PhD, MPE, MS, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:Washington University School of Medicine
Title:Post Doctoral Fellow
Contact Address:Department of Psychiatry, 660 S. Euclid - Campus Box 8134, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA
Contact Telephone:314.286.2298
Co-Authors:Kathleen K. Bucholz, PhD, MPE, Professor
Adolescent Risky Behaviors and Alcohol Use Problem: Adolescent alcohol use continues to be quite prevalent in the U.S., with 75% reporting trying alcohol at least once. Its co-occurrence with high-risk behaviors, such as drunk driving or unprotected sexual intercourse, places youth at risk for injuries and health problems. Theoretical Framework and Research Purpose: Using Pender's Health Promotion Model, the purpose of this research is to examine the relationships between adolescent alcohol use and various high risk behaviors. Methodology and Design: The sample of 555 (51% female and 51% Black), aged 13-19, for this cross-sectional study comes from a community-based family sample of adolescents in a mid-western state participating in a prospective study examining paternal alcoholism and adolescent problem behaviors. Analysis: Analyses thus far indicate 44% had tried alcohol, and of these, 47% reported heavy drinking during the previous year. Compared to nondrinkers, drinkers were significantly more likely to have had unprotected sexual intercourse, use marijuana, and smoke cigarettes. Among drinkers, 22% reported driving a car after excessive drinking and 31% rode in a car with someone who had been drinking. Of the drinkers, more than half reported sexual intercourse without a condom or with no contraception (53% and 65%, respectively). Nursing Implications: These results point to the need for educating adolescents on the risks associated with alcohol use and high-risk behaviors, for instance, the possible injuries resulting from drunk driving or riding with someone who has been drinking, or unprotected sex. Prevention should also focus on strengthening factors that decrease the propensity to engage in such behaviors. Nurses can identify key community and educational resources available to this population. Continuing analyses will examine correlations between similar high-risk behaviors with bivariate statistics, and multivariate analyses of predictors of high-risk behaviors. Supported by NIDA (T32 DA07313), (NIAAA) AA11998, and (NIAAA) AA12640. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdolescent Risky Behaviors and Alcohol Useen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160028-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adolescent Risky Behaviors and Alcohol Use</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Calvert, Wilma, PhD, MPE, MS, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington University School of Medicine</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post Doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Psychiatry, 660 S. Euclid - Campus Box 8134, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">314.286.2298</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">calvertw@psychiatry.wustl.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kathleen K. Bucholz, PhD, MPE, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Adolescent Risky Behaviors and Alcohol Use Problem: Adolescent alcohol use continues to be quite prevalent in the U.S., with 75% reporting trying alcohol at least once. Its co-occurrence with high-risk behaviors, such as drunk driving or unprotected sexual intercourse, places youth at risk for injuries and health problems. Theoretical Framework and Research Purpose: Using Pender's Health Promotion Model, the purpose of this research is to examine the relationships between adolescent alcohol use and various high risk behaviors. Methodology and Design: The sample of 555 (51% female and 51% Black), aged 13-19, for this cross-sectional study comes from a community-based family sample of adolescents in a mid-western state participating in a prospective study examining paternal alcoholism and adolescent problem behaviors. Analysis: Analyses thus far indicate 44% had tried alcohol, and of these, 47% reported heavy drinking during the previous year. Compared to nondrinkers, drinkers were significantly more likely to have had unprotected sexual intercourse, use marijuana, and smoke cigarettes. Among drinkers, 22% reported driving a car after excessive drinking and 31% rode in a car with someone who had been drinking. Of the drinkers, more than half reported sexual intercourse without a condom or with no contraception (53% and 65%, respectively). Nursing Implications: These results point to the need for educating adolescents on the risks associated with alcohol use and high-risk behaviors, for instance, the possible injuries resulting from drunk driving or riding with someone who has been drinking, or unprotected sex. Prevention should also focus on strengthening factors that decrease the propensity to engage in such behaviors. Nurses can identify key community and educational resources available to this population. Continuing analyses will examine correlations between similar high-risk behaviors with bivariate statistics, and multivariate analyses of predictors of high-risk behaviors. Supported by NIDA (T32 DA07313), (NIAAA) AA11998, and (NIAAA) AA12640. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:33:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:33:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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