2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160031
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceptions of Resource Loss, Depression, and Anxiety in Post-Abused Women
Abstract:
Perceptions of Resource Loss, Depression, and Anxiety in Post-Abused Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Clair, Debra, PhD, CNS, MSN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Akron
Title:Clinical Nurse Specialist
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, 3057 Sherbrook Drive, Uniontown, OH, 44685, USA
Contact Telephone:330-699-9260
Each year approximately 1.5 million women in the United States experience intimate partner violence (IPV). Many of these women suffer from depression and anxiety leading to poor physical and mental health outcomes. Women who leave IPV relationships experience resource losses that may exacerbate the depression and anxiety. The purpose of this study was to examine resource losses as predictors of depression and anxiety in post-abused women. Moderator variables were also examined for their effects on resources related to depression and anxiety. The Hobfoll Conservation of Resources Theory served as this study's organizing framework. The theory focuses on resource retention, protection and expansion and states that the loss of resources, actual or potential, is threatening and stressful. Because the loss of resources increases a person's stress, it is often responsible for stress-related outcomes such as depression and anxiety. Women were included in the purposive sample (N = 69) if they were 18 years or older, were at one time involved in a heterosexual intimate partner relationship, and were physically removed from the relationship for at least six months. A descriptive-correlational design was used. Regression analyses revealed that recent resource losses predicted depression, and past resource losses predicted anxiety (R square =.24). This predictive relationship was strengthened when several moderating variables were added to the regression model (R2 = .46 for depression and R2 = .43 for anxiety). All women who enter the health care system for help with physical and mental health problems need to be assessed for past abuse and resource losses. Health care professionals who are better informed about the subject of resource loss in post-abuse will develop interventions to overcome the barriers deterring post-abused women from full recovery.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceptions of Resource Loss, Depression, and Anxiety in Post-Abused Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160031-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perceptions of Resource Loss, Depression, and Anxiety in Post-Abused Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Clair, Debra, PhD, CNS, MSN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Akron</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Nurse Specialist</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, 3057 Sherbrook Drive, Uniontown, OH, 44685, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330-699-9260</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dclair@neo.rr.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Each year approximately 1.5 million women in the United States experience intimate partner violence (IPV). Many of these women suffer from depression and anxiety leading to poor physical and mental health outcomes. Women who leave IPV relationships experience resource losses that may exacerbate the depression and anxiety. The purpose of this study was to examine resource losses as predictors of depression and anxiety in post-abused women. Moderator variables were also examined for their effects on resources related to depression and anxiety. The Hobfoll Conservation of Resources Theory served as this study's organizing framework. The theory focuses on resource retention, protection and expansion and states that the loss of resources, actual or potential, is threatening and stressful. Because the loss of resources increases a person's stress, it is often responsible for stress-related outcomes such as depression and anxiety. Women were included in the purposive sample (N = 69) if they were 18 years or older, were at one time involved in a heterosexual intimate partner relationship, and were physically removed from the relationship for at least six months. A descriptive-correlational design was used. Regression analyses revealed that recent resource losses predicted depression, and past resource losses predicted anxiety (R square =.24). This predictive relationship was strengthened when several moderating variables were added to the regression model (R2 = .46 for depression and R2 = .43 for anxiety). All women who enter the health care system for help with physical and mental health problems need to be assessed for past abuse and resource losses. Health care professionals who are better informed about the subject of resource loss in post-abuse will develop interventions to overcome the barriers deterring post-abused women from full recovery.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:33:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:33:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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