Developing and Implementing a Healthy Heart Project for Underserved African American Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160033
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Developing and Implementing a Healthy Heart Project for Underserved African American Women
Abstract:
Developing and Implementing a Healthy Heart Project for Underserved African American Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Coke, Lola, APRN, BC, CNS, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:Rush University
Title:Principal Investigator
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 600 S. Paulina, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312-942-6180
Background: African American Women are at disproportionately high risk for cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension and obesity. Although these conditions can be prevented or minimized through healthy lifestyle changes, women in the Cabrini Green housing projects in Chicago, Illinois have little access to preventive health services. Purpose: The purpose of this collaborative project with Fourth Presbyterian Church was to develop and implement a culturally sensitive, population sub-group, socioeconomically focused, environmentally specific "Healthy Heart" program for these African American women. Goals included developing trust, evaluating available community physical activity resources, determining culturally specific content and motivational strategies. Methods: Informal focus groups and fellowship time determined learning needs and priorities of these women. Emerging themes expressed included high levels of stress, smoking cessation for the purpose of saving money, and desire to strengthen/tone body structure and increase physical activity. There was little desire to modify diet for weight loss. Modules for stress management, healthy eating, walking and strength training were developed based on culturally specific feedback from participants. Motivational strategies included group contests and gift incentives. Educational strategies included using culturally sensitive clip art and educational level appropriate terminology, journaling, content repetition and reinforcement, and visual and tactile content during both individual and group sessions. Results: Ten to sixteen women participated in weekly sessions for 24 weeks. The most effective strategies included individual counseling, group contest and gift incentives. Least effective strategies included lecture format instruction and journaling. Greatest program obstacles identified were communication and consistent weekly participation during the program. Four women lost weight and one improved diabetic glycemic control. Implications: Integrating the women's feedback into the program resulted in a population specific, culturally sensitive program that resulted in positive outcomes. Development of successful programs that promote healthy lifestyle is important to morbidity and mortality of these African American women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeveloping and Implementing a Healthy Heart Project for Underserved African American Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160033-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Developing and Implementing a Healthy Heart Project for Underserved African American Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Coke, Lola, APRN, BC, CNS, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Rush University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Principal Investigator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 600 S. Paulina, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-942-6180</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Lola_Coke@Rush.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: African American Women are at disproportionately high risk for cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension and obesity. Although these conditions can be prevented or minimized through healthy lifestyle changes, women in the Cabrini Green housing projects in Chicago, Illinois have little access to preventive health services. Purpose: The purpose of this collaborative project with Fourth Presbyterian Church was to develop and implement a culturally sensitive, population sub-group, socioeconomically focused, environmentally specific &quot;Healthy Heart&quot; program for these African American women. Goals included developing trust, evaluating available community physical activity resources, determining culturally specific content and motivational strategies. Methods: Informal focus groups and fellowship time determined learning needs and priorities of these women. Emerging themes expressed included high levels of stress, smoking cessation for the purpose of saving money, and desire to strengthen/tone body structure and increase physical activity. There was little desire to modify diet for weight loss. Modules for stress management, healthy eating, walking and strength training were developed based on culturally specific feedback from participants. Motivational strategies included group contests and gift incentives. Educational strategies included using culturally sensitive clip art and educational level appropriate terminology, journaling, content repetition and reinforcement, and visual and tactile content during both individual and group sessions. Results: Ten to sixteen women participated in weekly sessions for 24 weeks. The most effective strategies included individual counseling, group contest and gift incentives. Least effective strategies included lecture format instruction and journaling. Greatest program obstacles identified were communication and consistent weekly participation during the program. Four women lost weight and one improved diabetic glycemic control. Implications: Integrating the women's feedback into the program resulted in a population specific, culturally sensitive program that resulted in positive outcomes. Development of successful programs that promote healthy lifestyle is important to morbidity and mortality of these African American women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:33:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:33:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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