Feasibility Testing of a Shared Decision-Making Office Visit Program for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160034
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Feasibility Testing of a Shared Decision-Making Office Visit Program for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes
Abstract:
Feasibility Testing of a Shared Decision-Making Office Visit Program for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Corser, William, PhD, RN, CNAA
P.I. Institution Name:Michigan State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, A230 Life Sciences Building, East Lansing, MI, 48824-1317, USA
Contact Telephone:(517) 355-0328
Co-Authors:Margaret Holmes-Rovner, PhD, Professor; Catherine Lein, RN, MS, APRN; and Ved Gossain, MD, Professor
Purpose The study purpose was to test the feasibility and outcomes of a shared decision-making (SDM) program designed to assist type 2 diabetes patients to formulate diabetes management goals in primary care. Methods This pre-post study measured changes in patient outcomes over 6 months. Study outcomes included: a) rates of diabetes goal formulation, b) diabetes attitudes and empowerment levels, c) Hemoglobin A1c levels, weight, and blood pressure readings, and d) documented complications screening tests in 58 patients receiving care at an academic-based mid-Michigan clinic Results Patients completed an average of 2.42 (SD .583) office visits during the study period, and most reported having at least 3 to 4 other chronic health conditions. During educational/focus group program sessions, it was evident that although some healthier patients were primarily oriented toward improving their diabetes "information" levels, other patients were more interested in developing increased "motivation" to engage in goal-setting dialogues with healthcare professionals.

Over 77% of patients had at least one diabetes management goal documented in their medical records post intervention. Most were related to: a) increased exercise, b) lowering blood sugars, and c) modifying dietary fats. Patients' mean Hemoglobin A1C (p = .222), weight (p = .222), self-rated diabetes empowerment (p = .158), and life disruption levels (p = .085) improved at non-significant levels. Patients' diabetes knowledge levels increased significantly (p = .001). Documented complications screening test rates for this study were higher than published results from similar larger-scale diabetes intervention studies. Implications These results suggest that a SDM office visit program may be feasible for assisting many patients to formulate realistic diabetes management goals with professionals. Our results emphasize the importance of such goal-setting programs purposefully: 1. developing SDM printed materials and educational activities, 2. assessing each patient's prior diabetes management experiences, and 3. responding to patients' primary diabetes management motivations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFeasibility Testing of a Shared Decision-Making Office Visit Program for Patients with Type 2 Diabetesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160034-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Feasibility Testing of a Shared Decision-Making Office Visit Program for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Corser, William, PhD, RN, CNAA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Michigan State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, A230 Life Sciences Building, East Lansing, MI, 48824-1317, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(517) 355-0328</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Bill.Corser@ht.msu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Margaret Holmes-Rovner, PhD, Professor; Catherine Lein, RN, MS, APRN; and Ved Gossain, MD, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose The study purpose was to test the feasibility and outcomes of a shared decision-making (SDM) program designed to assist type 2 diabetes patients to formulate diabetes management goals in primary care. Methods This pre-post study measured changes in patient outcomes over 6 months. Study outcomes included: a) rates of diabetes goal formulation, b) diabetes attitudes and empowerment levels, c) Hemoglobin A1c levels, weight, and blood pressure readings, and d) documented complications screening tests in 58 patients receiving care at an academic-based mid-Michigan clinic Results Patients completed an average of 2.42 (SD .583) office visits during the study period, and most reported having at least 3 to 4 other chronic health conditions. During educational/focus group program sessions, it was evident that although some healthier patients were primarily oriented toward improving their diabetes &quot;information&quot; levels, other patients were more interested in developing increased &quot;motivation&quot; to engage in goal-setting dialogues with healthcare professionals.<br/><br/>Over 77% of patients had at least one diabetes management goal documented in their medical records post intervention. Most were related to: a) increased exercise, b) lowering blood sugars, and c) modifying dietary fats. Patients' mean Hemoglobin A1C (p = .222), weight (p = .222), self-rated diabetes empowerment (p = .158), and life disruption levels (p = .085) improved at non-significant levels. Patients' diabetes knowledge levels increased significantly (p = .001). Documented complications screening test rates for this study were higher than published results from similar larger-scale diabetes intervention studies. Implications These results suggest that a SDM office visit program may be feasible for assisting many patients to formulate realistic diabetes management goals with professionals. Our results emphasize the importance of such goal-setting programs purposefully: 1. developing SDM printed materials and educational activities, 2. assessing each patient's prior diabetes management experiences, and 3. responding to patients' primary diabetes management motivations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:33:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:33:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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