2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160035
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses' Perceptions of the Ethical Climate in Their Organizations
Abstract:
Nurses' Perceptions of the Ethical Climate in Their Organizations
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Daggett, Virginia, MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Bradley University
Title:Case Manager
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, 1501 W. Bradley Ave., Peoria, IL, 61625, USA
Contact Telephone:309-497-0790 ext 7366
Co-Authors:Jacklyn L. Ruthman, PhD, RN, Associate Professor
Professional nurses are confronted with complex ethical issues in their daily practice. Several studies have indicated the need to assist nurses in ethical decision making. In order for nurse executives to enhance the ethical decision making skills of clinical nurses they support, they must first know nurses' perceptions of their ethical climates and what ethical dilemmas nurses face. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to describe perceptions of the ethical climate in the hospitals where nurses practice and to identify ethical dilemmas they experienced. The theoretical framework guiding this study was Lawrence Kohlberg's Theory of Moral Development. Surveys were mailed to 300 registered nurses who were randomly selected from stratified zip codes from seven urban areas in Illinois. The three part survey measured demographic characteristics, the Hospital Ethical Climate Survey (HECS) and provided an opportunity to share a written exemplar of a clinical situation in which participants experienced moral distress. Of those surveyed, 33% (n=84) responded, but not all met the inclusion criteria of working in a hospital setting; therefore, data analysis was completed on 41 respondents who were typically female, Caucasian, at least baccalaureate prepared and 41 years old. Nurses had practiced an average of 13 years, were employed at their current institution for 10 years, dominantly as staff nurses. The HECS revealed a mean score of 93.76 (SD=15.87) suggesting nurses perceived their ethical climate favorably. There were variations among the five subscales. In addition, 58% of the nurses elaborated morally distressing situations that were categorized into five themes: lack of managerial support of quality of care, physicians' mismanagement of patients, sustaining preterm infants with technology, quality of life and dignity at the end of life in relation to treatments/ technology, and incompetent nursing care. Support to manage these situations is needed. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses' Perceptions of the Ethical Climate in Their Organizationsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160035-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurses' Perceptions of the Ethical Climate in Their Organizations</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Daggett, Virginia, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Bradley University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Case Manager</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, 1501 W. Bradley Ave., Peoria, IL, 61625, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">309-497-0790 ext 7366</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">virginia.daggett@med.va.gov</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jacklyn L. Ruthman, PhD, RN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Professional nurses are confronted with complex ethical issues in their daily practice. Several studies have indicated the need to assist nurses in ethical decision making. In order for nurse executives to enhance the ethical decision making skills of clinical nurses they support, they must first know nurses' perceptions of their ethical climates and what ethical dilemmas nurses face. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to describe perceptions of the ethical climate in the hospitals where nurses practice and to identify ethical dilemmas they experienced. The theoretical framework guiding this study was Lawrence Kohlberg's Theory of Moral Development. Surveys were mailed to 300 registered nurses who were randomly selected from stratified zip codes from seven urban areas in Illinois. The three part survey measured demographic characteristics, the Hospital Ethical Climate Survey (HECS) and provided an opportunity to share a written exemplar of a clinical situation in which participants experienced moral distress. Of those surveyed, 33% (n=84) responded, but not all met the inclusion criteria of working in a hospital setting; therefore, data analysis was completed on 41 respondents who were typically female, Caucasian, at least baccalaureate prepared and 41 years old. Nurses had practiced an average of 13 years, were employed at their current institution for 10 years, dominantly as staff nurses. The HECS revealed a mean score of 93.76 (SD=15.87) suggesting nurses perceived their ethical climate favorably. There were variations among the five subscales. In addition, 58% of the nurses elaborated morally distressing situations that were categorized into five themes: lack of managerial support of quality of care, physicians' mismanagement of patients, sustaining preterm infants with technology, quality of life and dignity at the end of life in relation to treatments/ technology, and incompetent nursing care. Support to manage these situations is needed. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:33:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:33:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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