2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160039
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Process of Medication Taking in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease
Abstract:
Process of Medication Taking in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Erlen, Judith, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pittsburgh
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 440 Victoria Building - 3500 Victoria Street, Pittsburgh, PA, 15261, USA
Contact Telephone:412-624-1905
Co-Authors:Mary Beth Happ, PhD, RN, Associate Professor
Medication taking presents unique challenges for persons with Alzheimer's disease and their family caregivers due to changes in cognitive function and behavior, other co-morbidities, and increasing dependence on caregivers. This mixed methods study examined the process of medication taking among persons with Alzheimer's disease living at home with a family member. The purposive sample included 16 patient-caregiver dyads. The 16 adults with Alzheimer's disease were 51-92 years; the family caregivers (4 daughters, 6 sons, 5 wives, and 5 husbands) were 35-84 years. Questionnaires were completed during the enrollment visit in the home. Researchers came to the home on two or more occasions to observe the in-home preparation and taking of medications. Interviews were conducted following the observations. Conversations occurring during the observation and the interviews were transcribed verbatim. The results show that control of medication taking represents a continuum of caregiver activities from limited responsibility for obtaining medicines to physically placing the pills in the patient's mouth. Behavioral and memory changes in the patient cue caregivers to change their role and the strategies that they use during medication taking.. These patient changes signal decreased trust by the caregiver of the patient's capabilities . Caregivers initiate new strategies after consulting with healthcare providers, friends, and/or family members, engaging in trial and error, or reviewing lay literature on the care of patients with cognitive decline. The various adjustments made by caregivers are not anticipated or planned and are rarely addressed in an anticipatory or educational way by clinicians. Specific behavioral cues exhibited by the patient may alert caregivers to the need for increased oversight of and participation in the medication taking regimen. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleProcess of Medication Taking in Patients with Alzheimer's Diseaseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160039-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Process of Medication Taking in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Erlen, Judith, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pittsburgh</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 440 Victoria Building - 3500 Victoria Street, Pittsburgh, PA, 15261, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">412-624-1905</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jae001@pitt.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary Beth Happ, PhD, RN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Medication taking presents unique challenges for persons with Alzheimer's disease and their family caregivers due to changes in cognitive function and behavior, other co-morbidities, and increasing dependence on caregivers. This mixed methods study examined the process of medication taking among persons with Alzheimer's disease living at home with a family member. The purposive sample included 16 patient-caregiver dyads. The 16 adults with Alzheimer's disease were 51-92 years; the family caregivers (4 daughters, 6 sons, 5 wives, and 5 husbands) were 35-84 years. Questionnaires were completed during the enrollment visit in the home. Researchers came to the home on two or more occasions to observe the in-home preparation and taking of medications. Interviews were conducted following the observations. Conversations occurring during the observation and the interviews were transcribed verbatim. The results show that control of medication taking represents a continuum of caregiver activities from limited responsibility for obtaining medicines to physically placing the pills in the patient's mouth. Behavioral and memory changes in the patient cue caregivers to change their role and the strategies that they use during medication taking.. These patient changes signal decreased trust by the caregiver of the patient's capabilities . Caregivers initiate new strategies after consulting with healthcare providers, friends, and/or family members, engaging in trial and error, or reviewing lay literature on the care of patients with cognitive decline. The various adjustments made by caregivers are not anticipated or planned and are rarely addressed in an anticipatory or educational way by clinicians. Specific behavioral cues exhibited by the patient may alert caregivers to the need for increased oversight of and participation in the medication taking regimen. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:34:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:34:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.