2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160043
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Affecting Nutritional Intake and Weight Retention in Postpartal Women
Abstract:
Factors Affecting Nutritional Intake and Weight Retention in Postpartal Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Fowles, Eileen, PhD, MSN, BS, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Illinois State University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Campus Box 5810, Normal, IL, 61761, USA
Contact Telephone:309-438-2576
Co-Authors:Lorraine Walker, EdD, RN, FAAN, Professor
PURPOSE: Women gain the greatest amount of weight between 25-44 years of age suggesting that weight gained during pregnancy and/or retained after delivery may contribute to obesity later in women's lives. The purpose of this study is to identify dietary intake patterns and other factors that affect dietary intake between postpartum women who retained and did not retain weight. METHOD: A secondary analysis was conducted. Information from the original study used in this analysis include: demographic information, biologic data (pre-pregnant body mass index, gestational weight gain and postpartum weight) and eating habits. Women were classified as having healthy eating patterns if they consumed the recommended number of servings in at least two food groups in the Food Guide Pyramid. FINDINGS: Women (N = 100) were 3-6 months postpartum. 56 women were categorized as having unhealthy eating patterns. Most women had inadequate intakes from the bread, vegetable and fruit food groups and frequent servings of sweet and greasy snacks. A significant relationship was noted between healthy eating patterns and breastfeeding (rho = .378, p. < .000. Breastfeeding women consumed the recommended number of bread, vegetables, fruits, and milk servings more frequently than non-breastfeeding mothers. No relationship between eating patterns and post-partum weight retention was noted, however 56 women retained more than 3 kg at 3-6 months after childbirth. Gestational weight gain and weight-related distress were significantly related to weight retention. CONCLUSIONS: Women who breastfeed ate more balanced diets, perhaps because they may make more purposeful efforts to eat healthy foods. Excessive weight gain during pregnancy led to an increase in postpartum weight retention. Women who retained weight after childbirth experienced more emotional distress because of the weight. These findings support the need for further research describing the quality of food intake during this critical transitional life period.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Affecting Nutritional Intake and Weight Retention in Postpartal Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160043-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors Affecting Nutritional Intake and Weight Retention in Postpartal Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fowles, Eileen, PhD, MSN, BS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Illinois State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Campus Box 5810, Normal, IL, 61761, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">309-438-2576</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">erfowle@ilstu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lorraine Walker, EdD, RN, FAAN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: Women gain the greatest amount of weight between 25-44 years of age suggesting that weight gained during pregnancy and/or retained after delivery may contribute to obesity later in women's lives. The purpose of this study is to identify dietary intake patterns and other factors that affect dietary intake between postpartum women who retained and did not retain weight. METHOD: A secondary analysis was conducted. Information from the original study used in this analysis include: demographic information, biologic data (pre-pregnant body mass index, gestational weight gain and postpartum weight) and eating habits. Women were classified as having healthy eating patterns if they consumed the recommended number of servings in at least two food groups in the Food Guide Pyramid. FINDINGS: Women (N = 100) were 3-6 months postpartum. 56 women were categorized as having unhealthy eating patterns. Most women had inadequate intakes from the bread, vegetable and fruit food groups and frequent servings of sweet and greasy snacks. A significant relationship was noted between healthy eating patterns and breastfeeding (rho = .378, p. &lt; .000. Breastfeeding women consumed the recommended number of bread, vegetables, fruits, and milk servings more frequently than non-breastfeeding mothers. No relationship between eating patterns and post-partum weight retention was noted, however 56 women retained more than 3 kg at 3-6 months after childbirth. Gestational weight gain and weight-related distress were significantly related to weight retention. CONCLUSIONS: Women who breastfeed ate more balanced diets, perhaps because they may make more purposeful efforts to eat healthy foods. Excessive weight gain during pregnancy led to an increase in postpartum weight retention. Women who retained weight after childbirth experienced more emotional distress because of the weight. These findings support the need for further research describing the quality of food intake during this critical transitional life period.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:34:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:34:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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