2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160044
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Spiritual Engagement in Cancer Patients
Abstract:
Spiritual Engagement in Cancer Patients
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Frank, Betsy, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana State University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 749 Chestnut, Terre Haute, IN, 47809, USA
Contact Telephone:812.237.3481
Co-Authors:Jean Kristeller, PhD; Virgil Sheets, PhD, Professor; and Tom Johnson, PhD, Professor
A diagnosis of cancer may engender feelings of vulnerability and often raises issues of existential identity and mortality. As a result, patients may undergo a change in their spiritual practices and beliefs. In order to deliver holistic care, nurses and other health care providers need to understand how cancer patients use these beliefs and practices to cope with their illness. Previous research using qualitative methods to explore spiritual engagement has largely focused upon patient populations who have had specific cancers. The purpose of this study was to explore how patients with a variety of cancer diagnoses described the shift in their spiritual and religious beliefs or practices since their diagnosis of cancer. As part of a larger study which explored the impact of an oncologist assisted spiritual intervention, 29 predominately Christian participants, with a mean age of 63, were interviewed during an appointment at a Midwest cancer center. Patients were asked how spirituality and religion helped them cope with their cancer and if their spiritual practices or experiences had changed in any way since their cancer diagnosis. Responses from the semi-structured, audio-taped interviews were analyzed using a phenomenological method adapted from Streubert (1991). Two researchers analyzed the transcripts for themes. When there was a disagreement during the analytical process, a third member of the research team viewed the transcripts and a consensus was then agreed upon. Themes that emerged were: staying the course, sense of peace/acceptance, it is in God's hands, support from prayer and church, appreciation of social support network, and increased compassion for others. Nurses can use this information when helping cancer patients to enhance their coping strategies.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSpiritual Engagement in Cancer Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160044-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Spiritual Engagement in Cancer Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Frank, Betsy, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 749 Chestnut, Terre Haute, IN, 47809, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">812.237.3481</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Betsy-Frank@indstate.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jean Kristeller, PhD; Virgil Sheets, PhD, Professor; and Tom Johnson, PhD, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A diagnosis of cancer may engender feelings of vulnerability and often raises issues of existential identity and mortality. As a result, patients may undergo a change in their spiritual practices and beliefs. In order to deliver holistic care, nurses and other health care providers need to understand how cancer patients use these beliefs and practices to cope with their illness. Previous research using qualitative methods to explore spiritual engagement has largely focused upon patient populations who have had specific cancers. The purpose of this study was to explore how patients with a variety of cancer diagnoses described the shift in their spiritual and religious beliefs or practices since their diagnosis of cancer. As part of a larger study which explored the impact of an oncologist assisted spiritual intervention, 29 predominately Christian participants, with a mean age of 63, were interviewed during an appointment at a Midwest cancer center. Patients were asked how spirituality and religion helped them cope with their cancer and if their spiritual practices or experiences had changed in any way since their cancer diagnosis. Responses from the semi-structured, audio-taped interviews were analyzed using a phenomenological method adapted from Streubert (1991). Two researchers analyzed the transcripts for themes. When there was a disagreement during the analytical process, a third member of the research team viewed the transcripts and a consensus was then agreed upon. Themes that emerged were: staying the course, sense of peace/acceptance, it is in God's hands, support from prayer and church, appreciation of social support network, and increased compassion for others. Nurses can use this information when helping cancer patients to enhance their coping strategies.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:34:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:34:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.