2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160047
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Muscle Strength, Balance, and Falls of Older Women
Abstract:
Muscle Strength, Balance, and Falls of Older Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Gaspar, Phyllis, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Winona State University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, Stark Hall, Winona, MN, 55987, USA
Contact Telephone:507-457-5634
Co-Authors:Judith Bautch, PhD, RN, Professor
The purposes of this study were to: 1) describe the changes that occur in grip strength, lower extremity strength and balance over time among older women, and 2) compare these changes for fallers and non-fallers . Prevention of falls among community dwelling individuals remains a major challenge for nursing. Identification of variables that can determine risk for falls is essential. This study is a part of an overall epidemiological study of the health and disease among community dwelling Religious Sisters. The epidemiological model of human-environmental interactions served as the conceptual basis for this study with the sample purposefully selected because of the common risk factors controlled by the homogeneity of this population. The sample consisted of 70 sisters who were 50 years or older (mean age = 70 years) who participated in the functional performance aspect of the data collection for a minimum of two years. Subjects completed self-report health related questionnaires (SF36, HealthCalc, fall history) and a functional evaluation was conducted using the Guralnik Functional Performance Battery which includes measures of grip strength with a goniometer, timed sit to stand and standing balance (side-by-side, semi-tandem and tandem). Subjects had a gradual decline in grip strength, lower extremity strength and ability to hold a tandem stand. Grip strength was negatively associated with age (p<.05). Differences in grip, lower extremity strength and balance standing were calculated between fallers and non-fallers. Mean grip strength (generally of the non-dominant hand) was significantly greater for the non-fallers (left hand grip example: fallers x = 17.9 (n=20); non-fallers x = 20.2 (n=39); F=4.3;p=.042). Decrease in non-dominant hand grip strength among subjects who fell may reflect overall loss of muscle strength and may be a predictor of falls. Further investigation of grip strength, an easily measured parameter as a predictor of falls is warranted.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMuscle Strength, Balance, and Falls of Older Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160047-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Muscle Strength, Balance, and Falls of Older Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gaspar, Phyllis, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Winona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, Stark Hall, Winona, MN, 55987, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">507-457-5634</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pgaspar@winona.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Judith Bautch, PhD, RN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purposes of this study were to: 1) describe the changes that occur in grip strength, lower extremity strength and balance over time among older women, and 2) compare these changes for fallers and non-fallers . Prevention of falls among community dwelling individuals remains a major challenge for nursing. Identification of variables that can determine risk for falls is essential. This study is a part of an overall epidemiological study of the health and disease among community dwelling Religious Sisters. The epidemiological model of human-environmental interactions served as the conceptual basis for this study with the sample purposefully selected because of the common risk factors controlled by the homogeneity of this population. The sample consisted of 70 sisters who were 50 years or older (mean age = 70 years) who participated in the functional performance aspect of the data collection for a minimum of two years. Subjects completed self-report health related questionnaires (SF36, HealthCalc, fall history) and a functional evaluation was conducted using the Guralnik Functional Performance Battery which includes measures of grip strength with a goniometer, timed sit to stand and standing balance (side-by-side, semi-tandem and tandem). Subjects had a gradual decline in grip strength, lower extremity strength and ability to hold a tandem stand. Grip strength was negatively associated with age (p&lt;.05). Differences in grip, lower extremity strength and balance standing were calculated between fallers and non-fallers. Mean grip strength (generally of the non-dominant hand) was significantly greater for the non-fallers (left hand grip example: fallers x = 17.9 (n=20); non-fallers x = 20.2 (n=39); F=4.3;p=.042). Decrease in non-dominant hand grip strength among subjects who fell may reflect overall loss of muscle strength and may be a predictor of falls. Further investigation of grip strength, an easily measured parameter as a predictor of falls is warranted.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:34:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:34:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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