The Relationships Among Hope, Hardiness, and Perceived and Actual Blood Pressure Control in Hypertensive Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160049
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationships Among Hope, Hardiness, and Perceived and Actual Blood Pressure Control in Hypertensive Adults
Abstract:
The Relationships Among Hope, Hardiness, and Perceived and Actual Blood Pressure Control in Hypertensive Adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Giordana, Sheri, ND, MSN, FNP, CNS
P.I. Institution Name:Northern Michigan University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Nursing Department, 192 N. Casagranda Rd., Crystal Falls, MI, 49920, USA
Contact Telephone:906 822-7224
The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among levels of hope, hardiness, and perceived and actual blood pressure control in hypertensive adults. A diagnosis of hypertension, its management, and possible side effects can cause multiple stressors in the hypertensive adult's life. Based on Lazarus and colleague's theory, these stressors can lead to cognitive appraisal and coping. Hypertensive individuals with high levels of hope and hardiness may interpret a diagnosis of hypertension as an opportunity or challenge to promote his/her health (adaptation). This study used a convenience sample of 101 adults. Participants were 30 years of age or older, with a diagnosis of hypertension for at least one year. Data collection was accomplished with a demographic data form that included two actual blood pressure measurements taken 15 minutes apart, the Herth Hope Index (HHI) that measured level of hope, the Health Related Hardiness Scale (HRHS) that measured the hardiness construct, and a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) that measured the patients' perception of blood pressure control. Pearson correlation coefficient was used in this study to examine the relationships among hope, hardiness, and perceived blood pressure control. T-tests were used to determine if there were differences in hope, hardiness, and perceived BP control scores in two groups of participants: 1) those with blood pressure readings indicating actual control, < 139 systolic and < 89; and 2) participants with blood pressure readings indicating they were less well-controlled, > 140 systolic and/or > 90 diastolic. Participants in this study had high levels of hope, hardiness, and perceived blood pressure control. The data suggest that hope and hardiness are significantly related and both are significantly related to perceived blood pressure control, also. By supporting their patients hope and hardiness, nurses can help their clients become active agents in promoting their own health (adaptation). [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationships Among Hope, Hardiness, and Perceived and Actual Blood Pressure Control in Hypertensive Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160049-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Relationships Among Hope, Hardiness, and Perceived and Actual Blood Pressure Control in Hypertensive Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Giordana, Sheri, ND, MSN, FNP, CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northern Michigan University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Department, 192 N. Casagranda Rd., Crystal Falls, MI, 49920, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">906 822-7224</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sgiordan@nmu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among levels of hope, hardiness, and perceived and actual blood pressure control in hypertensive adults. A diagnosis of hypertension, its management, and possible side effects can cause multiple stressors in the hypertensive adult's life. Based on Lazarus and colleague's theory, these stressors can lead to cognitive appraisal and coping. Hypertensive individuals with high levels of hope and hardiness may interpret a diagnosis of hypertension as an opportunity or challenge to promote his/her health (adaptation). This study used a convenience sample of 101 adults. Participants were 30 years of age or older, with a diagnosis of hypertension for at least one year. Data collection was accomplished with a demographic data form that included two actual blood pressure measurements taken 15 minutes apart, the Herth Hope Index (HHI) that measured level of hope, the Health Related Hardiness Scale (HRHS) that measured the hardiness construct, and a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) that measured the patients' perception of blood pressure control. Pearson correlation coefficient was used in this study to examine the relationships among hope, hardiness, and perceived blood pressure control. T-tests were used to determine if there were differences in hope, hardiness, and perceived BP control scores in two groups of participants: 1) those with blood pressure readings indicating actual control, &lt; 139 systolic and &lt; 89; and 2) participants with blood pressure readings indicating they were less well-controlled, &gt; 140 systolic and/or &gt; 90 diastolic. Participants in this study had high levels of hope, hardiness, and perceived blood pressure control. The data suggest that hope and hardiness are significantly related and both are significantly related to perceived blood pressure control, also. By supporting their patients hope and hardiness, nurses can help their clients become active agents in promoting their own health (adaptation). [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:34:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:34:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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