Comparison of Prenatal Coping Strategies, Cortisol, and Anti-inflammatory Cytokines between low-risk and high-risk pregnant African-American women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160050
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison of Prenatal Coping Strategies, Cortisol, and Anti-inflammatory Cytokines between low-risk and high-risk pregnant African-American women
Abstract:
Comparison of Prenatal Coping Strategies, Cortisol, and Anti-inflammatory Cytokines between low-risk and high-risk pregnant African-American women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Giurgescu, Carmen, PhD, RN, WHNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Post Doctoral Fellow
Contact Address:Maternal Child Nursing, 845 S Damen, Chicago, IL, 60521, USA
Contact Telephone:312-996-8051
Co-Authors:Linda Janusek, PhD, RN; Herbert Mathews, PhD; and Fred B Bryant, PhD, Professor
High-risk pregnancy places both a physical and psychological burden on women and heralds a time of increased stress for these women. High-risk pregnant women who report high levels of uncertainty use avoidance to cope with their situation and this strategy is related to psychological distress. Psychological distress may lead to activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis by increasing the release of cortisol and production of cytokines. Women diagnosed with gestational hypertension (GH) may have higher levels of psychological distress, cortisol levels, and cytokine production that are linked to preterm delivery. Studies of animal model and non-pregnant human subjects suggest a relationship exists among coping strategies, cortisol, and immune function. However, no research has examined this potential relationship in pregnant women. This study aims to obtain pilot data for a preliminary test of a model of psychological and physiological outcomes related to preterm delivery. The Stress and Coping Transactional model and the Psychoneuroimmunological framework will guide this study. We propose a comparative, correlational, cross-sectional design to examine the relationship among prenatal coping strategies, cortisol, and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1ra, TNF-RII) in a group of low-risk pregnant African-American (AA) women (n=39) and AA women diagnosed with GH (n=39) between 30-35 weeks gestation. The sample will be recruited from two urban medical centers. Data collection is in progress. Prenatal coping strategies are collected by the Prenatal Coping Inventory. Serum cortisol is measured by radioimmunoassay and serum anti-inflammatory cytokines are measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Additional variables include uncertainty, social support, psychological distress, maternal characteristics, and delivery data. Descriptive statistics, correlational techniques, and independent groups t-tests will be used for analysis. After completion of this project, we will develop a larger protocol and submit an application to NIH to further test the model. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison of Prenatal Coping Strategies, Cortisol, and Anti-inflammatory Cytokines between low-risk and high-risk pregnant African-American womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160050-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparison of Prenatal Coping Strategies, Cortisol, and Anti-inflammatory Cytokines between low-risk and high-risk pregnant African-American women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Giurgescu, Carmen, PhD, RN, WHNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post Doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Maternal Child Nursing, 845 S Damen, Chicago, IL, 60521, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-996-8051</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">carmeng7030@sbcglobal.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Linda Janusek, PhD, RN; Herbert Mathews, PhD; and Fred B Bryant, PhD, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">High-risk pregnancy places both a physical and psychological burden on women and heralds a time of increased stress for these women. High-risk pregnant women who report high levels of uncertainty use avoidance to cope with their situation and this strategy is related to psychological distress. Psychological distress may lead to activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis by increasing the release of cortisol and production of cytokines. Women diagnosed with gestational hypertension (GH) may have higher levels of psychological distress, cortisol levels, and cytokine production that are linked to preterm delivery. Studies of animal model and non-pregnant human subjects suggest a relationship exists among coping strategies, cortisol, and immune function. However, no research has examined this potential relationship in pregnant women. This study aims to obtain pilot data for a preliminary test of a model of psychological and physiological outcomes related to preterm delivery. The Stress and Coping Transactional model and the Psychoneuroimmunological framework will guide this study. We propose a comparative, correlational, cross-sectional design to examine the relationship among prenatal coping strategies, cortisol, and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1ra, TNF-RII) in a group of low-risk pregnant African-American (AA) women (n=39) and AA women diagnosed with GH (n=39) between 30-35 weeks gestation. The sample will be recruited from two urban medical centers. Data collection is in progress. Prenatal coping strategies are collected by the Prenatal Coping Inventory. Serum cortisol is measured by radioimmunoassay and serum anti-inflammatory cytokines are measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Additional variables include uncertainty, social support, psychological distress, maternal characteristics, and delivery data. Descriptive statistics, correlational techniques, and independent groups t-tests will be used for analysis. After completion of this project, we will develop a larger protocol and submit an application to NIH to further test the model. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:34:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:34:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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