Effectiveness of the Chicago Parent Program for Low-Income Ethnic Minority Families

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160051
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effectiveness of the Chicago Parent Program for Low-Income Ethnic Minority Families
Abstract:
Effectiveness of the Chicago Parent Program for Low-Income Ethnic Minority Families
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Gross, Deborah, DNSc, MS, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Rush University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:Women's & Children's Health Nursing, 600 South Paulina Avenue - Suite 1080, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312/942-6201
Most parent training (PT) programs use strategies consistent with European-American values. Not surprisingly, the greatest PT effects have been found among middle-class European-American samples. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the development and testing of a program that is culturally and contextually relevant to low-income ethnic minority parents raising young children. The PT program is based on social learning theory. The researchers collaborated with a parent advisory council to ensure that the program addressed the needs and interests of low-income ethnic minority families with young children. The result of this collaboration was the development of a 12-week PT program, called The Chicago Parent Program. Using a quasi-experimental design, 7 day care centers serving low-income families were matched and randomly assigned to an intervention or waiting-list control condition (96% African-American or Latino). Participants were parents or legal guardians of 2-4 year old children enrolled in one of the participating day care centers. Intervention group parents (n = 156) completed research assessments and attended the 12-week program. Control group parents (n = 136) completed research assessments only. Parents and children were assessed at baseline, post-intervention, and at 6-month and 1-year follow-ups. Outcomes include child behavior problems, parent self-efficacy, and quality of parent-child interactions. Data from parents, teachers, and observations were obtained and analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. Results indicate that intervention children had significantly fewer behavior problems than control children based on teacher report and observations. Intervention parents were observed to use more positive behaviors and fewer negative behaviors during observed parent-child interactions. Discussion will focus on work with the parent advisory board and the effectiveness of The Chicago Parent Program for reducing risk factors associated with poor outcomes in young children.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffectiveness of the Chicago Parent Program for Low-Income Ethnic Minority Familiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160051-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effectiveness of the Chicago Parent Program for Low-Income Ethnic Minority Families</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gross, Deborah, DNSc, MS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Rush University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Women's &amp; Children's Health Nursing, 600 South Paulina Avenue - Suite 1080, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312/942-6201</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Deborah_A_Gross@rush.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Most parent training (PT) programs use strategies consistent with European-American values. Not surprisingly, the greatest PT effects have been found among middle-class European-American samples. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the development and testing of a program that is culturally and contextually relevant to low-income ethnic minority parents raising young children. The PT program is based on social learning theory. The researchers collaborated with a parent advisory council to ensure that the program addressed the needs and interests of low-income ethnic minority families with young children. The result of this collaboration was the development of a 12-week PT program, called The Chicago Parent Program. Using a quasi-experimental design, 7 day care centers serving low-income families were matched and randomly assigned to an intervention or waiting-list control condition (96% African-American or Latino). Participants were parents or legal guardians of 2-4 year old children enrolled in one of the participating day care centers. Intervention group parents (n = 156) completed research assessments and attended the 12-week program. Control group parents (n = 136) completed research assessments only. Parents and children were assessed at baseline, post-intervention, and at 6-month and 1-year follow-ups. Outcomes include child behavior problems, parent self-efficacy, and quality of parent-child interactions. Data from parents, teachers, and observations were obtained and analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. Results indicate that intervention children had significantly fewer behavior problems than control children based on teacher report and observations. Intervention parents were observed to use more positive behaviors and fewer negative behaviors during observed parent-child interactions. Discussion will focus on work with the parent advisory board and the effectiveness of The Chicago Parent Program for reducing risk factors associated with poor outcomes in young children.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:34:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:34:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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