Competing Logics of Family Experience and Genetic Facts: Impact on Perceived Risk and Decision Making in Women at Risk for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160054
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Competing Logics of Family Experience and Genetic Facts: Impact on Perceived Risk and Decision Making in Women at Risk for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer
Abstract:
Competing Logics of Family Experience and Genetic Facts: Impact on Perceived Risk and Decision Making in Women at Risk for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Hamilton, Rebekah, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pittsburgh
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:451A Victoria Building -SON, 3500 Victoria Street, Pittsburgh, PA, 15261, USA
Contact Telephone:412-648-9259
Problem: Individuals who receive a positive genetic test results for the BRCA mutations must try to incorporate complex genetic information into their experience of being at increased risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). Significance: Individuals at increased risk for HBOC often are acutely aware of their family's history with cancer. Genetic testing has made it possible for individuals to know if they too may be part of the family cancer legacy. Anthropologists argue that the new genetics has changed the concept of kinship. I will argue that the family experience with cancer sets up a competing logic with the genetics information provided by health care professionals. This competing logic impacts how risk is understood and what information is used to make medical decisions. Methodology: Grounded theory was used to explore the experience of predictive genetic testing. Nineteen individuals, recruited via the Internet were interviewed by either phone or email. Findings: Blending family history and genetic facts was one of the major processes developed during axial coding. For most participants the science of genetics was simply one of several factors that informed their perception of risk and their subsequent decisions. This scientific information had no greater salience, and often less, than did risk understandings based on family history. Implications: While others have suggested that the new genetics changes the idea of kinship, this study presents data supporting the idea that kinship and family context change how genetic facts are understood and the meaning they take on. It appears that family history has a greater influence on genetic understandings than genetic 'facts' have when the two logics are competing. This is clinically important in that women's actions after BRCA testing are influenced. Understanding these competing logics may assist health care providers in counseling individuals at risk for HBOC.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCompeting Logics of Family Experience and Genetic Facts: Impact on Perceived Risk and Decision Making in Women at Risk for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160054-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Competing Logics of Family Experience and Genetic Facts: Impact on Perceived Risk and Decision Making in Women at Risk for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hamilton, Rebekah, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pittsburgh</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">451A Victoria Building -SON, 3500 Victoria Street, Pittsburgh, PA, 15261, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">412-648-9259</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hamilr@pitt.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Individuals who receive a positive genetic test results for the BRCA mutations must try to incorporate complex genetic information into their experience of being at increased risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). Significance: Individuals at increased risk for HBOC often are acutely aware of their family's history with cancer. Genetic testing has made it possible for individuals to know if they too may be part of the family cancer legacy. Anthropologists argue that the new genetics has changed the concept of kinship. I will argue that the family experience with cancer sets up a competing logic with the genetics information provided by health care professionals. This competing logic impacts how risk is understood and what information is used to make medical decisions. Methodology: Grounded theory was used to explore the experience of predictive genetic testing. Nineteen individuals, recruited via the Internet were interviewed by either phone or email. Findings: Blending family history and genetic facts was one of the major processes developed during axial coding. For most participants the science of genetics was simply one of several factors that informed their perception of risk and their subsequent decisions. This scientific information had no greater salience, and often less, than did risk understandings based on family history. Implications: While others have suggested that the new genetics changes the idea of kinship, this study presents data supporting the idea that kinship and family context change how genetic facts are understood and the meaning they take on. It appears that family history has a greater influence on genetic understandings than genetic 'facts' have when the two logics are competing. This is clinically important in that women's actions after BRCA testing are influenced. Understanding these competing logics may assist health care providers in counseling individuals at risk for HBOC.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:34:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:34:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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