2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160057
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Parental Regulation of Asthma in Preschool Children
Abstract:
Parental Regulation of Asthma in Preschool Children
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Harrison, Tondi, MSN, RN, CPNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin - Madison
Title:Predoctoral Student
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 600 Highland Avenue, K6-374, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA
Contact Telephone:608-263-9040
Co-Authors:Sandra E Ward, PhD, RN, FAAN and Ron Serlin, PhD
Purpose: Although effective treatment for childhood asthma is available, adherence is low. Reduced adherence is associated with parental beliefs that discount the necessity and safety of asthma treatment plans. Increased adherence and improved outcomes are associated with higher levels of self-regulatory behavior. Identifying specific beliefs about asthma present at each level of self-regulation provides a framework for developing interventions to promote progression to higher levels of self-regulation. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesized relationship between parental beliefs about asthma and level (phase) of asthma self-regulation. Theoretical Framework: The Common Sense Model and the Phase Model of Asthma Self-Regulation guided this study. Sample: A convenience sample of 51 parents of three-to-six-year-old children with asthma. Methods: Telephone interviews were conducted using (1) the Asthma Health Beliefs Interview, identifying the presence or absence of 11 asthma health beliefs and (2) the Asthma Self-Regulatory Development Interview (ASRDI), measuring phase of asthma self-regulatory development. Nonparametric tests were used to test differences between phases. Results: Eleven asthma health beliefs identified in the literature were confirmed in this sample. Ninety-eight percent of parents in this sample scored at Phase 3 or Phase 4. No significant differences in beliefs about asthma were found between parents in these two phases of asthma self-regulation. Discussion: Several possible reasons were identified for these results: (a) the sample studied was quite different from samples in previous studies using the ASRDI, (b) the instrument used to classify parents by phase was not sensitive or specific enough to accurately determine level of self-regulation, or (c) these models were not useful for describing self-regulatory behaviors in this sample. Studies designed to more thoroughly describe how parents make decisions about managing their child's asthma are critical in order to enhance our understanding of the process of developing the skills of asthma self-regulation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParental Regulation of Asthma in Preschool Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160057-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Parental Regulation of Asthma in Preschool Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Harrison, Tondi, MSN, RN, CPNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin - Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Predoctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 600 Highland Avenue, K6-374, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608-263-9040</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tmharrison@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sandra E Ward, PhD, RN, FAAN and Ron Serlin, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Although effective treatment for childhood asthma is available, adherence is low. Reduced adherence is associated with parental beliefs that discount the necessity and safety of asthma treatment plans. Increased adherence and improved outcomes are associated with higher levels of self-regulatory behavior. Identifying specific beliefs about asthma present at each level of self-regulation provides a framework for developing interventions to promote progression to higher levels of self-regulation. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesized relationship between parental beliefs about asthma and level (phase) of asthma self-regulation. Theoretical Framework: The Common Sense Model and the Phase Model of Asthma Self-Regulation guided this study. Sample: A convenience sample of 51 parents of three-to-six-year-old children with asthma. Methods: Telephone interviews were conducted using (1) the Asthma Health Beliefs Interview, identifying the presence or absence of 11 asthma health beliefs and (2) the Asthma Self-Regulatory Development Interview (ASRDI), measuring phase of asthma self-regulatory development. Nonparametric tests were used to test differences between phases. Results: Eleven asthma health beliefs identified in the literature were confirmed in this sample. Ninety-eight percent of parents in this sample scored at Phase 3 or Phase 4. No significant differences in beliefs about asthma were found between parents in these two phases of asthma self-regulation. Discussion: Several possible reasons were identified for these results: (a) the sample studied was quite different from samples in previous studies using the ASRDI, (b) the instrument used to classify parents by phase was not sensitive or specific enough to accurately determine level of self-regulation, or (c) these models were not useful for describing self-regulatory behaviors in this sample. Studies designed to more thoroughly describe how parents make decisions about managing their child's asthma are critical in order to enhance our understanding of the process of developing the skills of asthma self-regulation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:35:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:35:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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