Mothers' Decisions Regarding When and Why to Introduce Solid Foods to Their Infants: Influencing Factors

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160058
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mothers' Decisions Regarding When and Why to Introduce Solid Foods to Their Infants: Influencing Factors
Abstract:
Mothers' Decisions Regarding When and Why to Introduce Solid Foods to Their Infants: Influencing Factors
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Horodynski, Mildred, PhD, MN, BSN, WHNPC
P.I. Institution Name:Michigan State University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 415B West Fee Hall, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA
Contact Telephone:517-432-0198
Co-Authors:Beth Olson, PhD, Assistant Professor; Holly Brophy-Herb, PhD, Associate Professor; Karen Shirer, PhD, Assistant Professor; and Mary Jo Arndt, EdD, MA, MEd, BSN, Associate Professor
Early introduction of solid foods and beverages, prior to the recommended 4-6 months of age, is a risk factor for later overweight. The purpose of this research was to identify what factors influenced mothers' decisions to introduce solid foods to their infants. The Theory of Dependent Care guided the study such that mothers (dependent-care agent) are able to meet their infants' therapeutic self care demands related to introduction of solids. Six focus groups with African American and white mothers, enrolled in Medicaid, with infants 0-12 months old were conducted. Participants (N=23) were 20-41 years old, 1/3 were married, and most were not employed. Data analysis was done using methods described by Krueger and Casey (2000). Findings revealed that mothers had heard of the recommendation to introduce solid foods no earlier than 4-6 months of age, recognized developmental cues as one reason for not introducing solids earlier, and expressed agreement with the AAP recommendation. However, many women did not consider use of small amounts of cereal (commonly given in a formula bottle) or other soft baby foods as introduction of solids. Reasons for introduction of solids included: belief the baby was drinking too much or not getting enough calories from formula or breast milk, to help the baby to sleep through the night, and medical conditions (e.g. acid reflux). Main sources of feeding advice were doctors and female relatives. African American mothers were more likely to value advice from their mothers, while white mothers were more likely to value advice from health professionals. Women indicated they would consider a later introduction of solids if given information that early introduction would harm their infants. Implications include education to delay introduction of solids must address mothers' definition of solids, perceived needs for solids, and the value they place on advice from others.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMothers' Decisions Regarding When and Why to Introduce Solid Foods to Their Infants: Influencing Factorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160058-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Mothers' Decisions Regarding When and Why to Introduce Solid Foods to Their Infants: Influencing Factors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Horodynski, Mildred, PhD, MN, BSN, WHNPC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Michigan State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 415B West Fee Hall, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">517-432-0198</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">millie@msu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Beth Olson, PhD, Assistant Professor; Holly Brophy-Herb, PhD, Associate Professor; Karen Shirer, PhD, Assistant Professor; and Mary Jo Arndt, EdD, MA, MEd, BSN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Early introduction of solid foods and beverages, prior to the recommended 4-6 months of age, is a risk factor for later overweight. The purpose of this research was to identify what factors influenced mothers' decisions to introduce solid foods to their infants. The Theory of Dependent Care guided the study such that mothers (dependent-care agent) are able to meet their infants' therapeutic self care demands related to introduction of solids. Six focus groups with African American and white mothers, enrolled in Medicaid, with infants 0-12 months old were conducted. Participants (N=23) were 20-41 years old, 1/3 were married, and most were not employed. Data analysis was done using methods described by Krueger and Casey (2000). Findings revealed that mothers had heard of the recommendation to introduce solid foods no earlier than 4-6 months of age, recognized developmental cues as one reason for not introducing solids earlier, and expressed agreement with the AAP recommendation. However, many women did not consider use of small amounts of cereal (commonly given in a formula bottle) or other soft baby foods as introduction of solids. Reasons for introduction of solids included: belief the baby was drinking too much or not getting enough calories from formula or breast milk, to help the baby to sleep through the night, and medical conditions (e.g. acid reflux). Main sources of feeding advice were doctors and female relatives. African American mothers were more likely to value advice from their mothers, while white mothers were more likely to value advice from health professionals. Women indicated they would consider a later introduction of solids if given information that early introduction would harm their infants. Implications include education to delay introduction of solids must address mothers' definition of solids, perceived needs for solids, and the value they place on advice from others.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:35:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:35:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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