2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160060
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measuring Behavior Problems: Understanding Disagreement Among Informants
Abstract:
Measuring Behavior Problems: Understanding Disagreement Among Informants
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Johnson, Mary, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Rush University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Community and Mental Health Nursing, 600 S. Paulina St. #1030D, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312-942-2766
Co-Authors:Susan M. Breitenstein, MS, APRN, BC
Purpose: The purpose of this triangulated study was to understand the reasons for informant agreement and disagreement when measuring the behavior of preschool children. Subjects: 18 cases of parent/teacher/child triads were stratified into 4 groups: 5 cases with parent/teacher agreement that the child did not have behavior problems, 5 cases with parent/ teacher agreement that the child did have behavior problems, 3 cases in which the teacher rated the child as high behavior problems but the parent rated the child's behavior as within normal limits and 5 cases in which the parent rated the child as high behavior problems but the teacher rated the child's behavior as within normal limits. Methods: The teachers and the parents of children ages 2-5 were individually interviewed in an unstructured format asking each to talk about their experiences with the child. Each child was observed for one hour in the daycare center. Qualitative data were analyzed line by line for common themes. Qualitative from this study and quantitative data from the larger study were triangulated for areas of convergence and divergence. Results: Parent/teacher agreement and qualitative/quantitative agreement in the assessment of behavior were both approximately 55%. Explanatory reasons for disagreement between parent/teacher ratings and qualitative/quantitative ratings were organized into the following categories: setting; parent characteristics; teacher characteristics; child characteristics; parent and teacher normed references; and parent and teacher behavioral attributions. Conclusions: Parent and teacher's assessment of children's behavior is unique and dependent upon the individual's world view. Measurement of behavior implies an objective assessment of the child's behavior. However, behavior problems occur within contexts that include the informants' perspective and the setting in which the behavior occurs. Results of this study confirm the need to include multi-method, multi-informant assessments of behavior when assessing the effectiveness of a behavioral intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasuring Behavior Problems: Understanding Disagreement Among Informantsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160060-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Measuring Behavior Problems: Understanding Disagreement Among Informants</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Johnson, Mary, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Rush University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Community and Mental Health Nursing, 600 S. Paulina St. #1030D, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-942-2766</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mary_e_johnson@rush.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susan M. Breitenstein, MS, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this triangulated study was to understand the reasons for informant agreement and disagreement when measuring the behavior of preschool children. Subjects: 18 cases of parent/teacher/child triads were stratified into 4 groups: 5 cases with parent/teacher agreement that the child did not have behavior problems, 5 cases with parent/ teacher agreement that the child did have behavior problems, 3 cases in which the teacher rated the child as high behavior problems but the parent rated the child's behavior as within normal limits and 5 cases in which the parent rated the child as high behavior problems but the teacher rated the child's behavior as within normal limits. Methods: The teachers and the parents of children ages 2-5 were individually interviewed in an unstructured format asking each to talk about their experiences with the child. Each child was observed for one hour in the daycare center. Qualitative data were analyzed line by line for common themes. Qualitative from this study and quantitative data from the larger study were triangulated for areas of convergence and divergence. Results: Parent/teacher agreement and qualitative/quantitative agreement in the assessment of behavior were both approximately 55%. Explanatory reasons for disagreement between parent/teacher ratings and qualitative/quantitative ratings were organized into the following categories: setting; parent characteristics; teacher characteristics; child characteristics; parent and teacher normed references; and parent and teacher behavioral attributions. Conclusions: Parent and teacher's assessment of children's behavior is unique and dependent upon the individual's world view. Measurement of behavior implies an objective assessment of the child's behavior. However, behavior problems occur within contexts that include the informants' perspective and the setting in which the behavior occurs. Results of this study confirm the need to include multi-method, multi-informant assessments of behavior when assessing the effectiveness of a behavioral intervention.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:35:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:35:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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