Residence on Multiple Units During Hospitalization: The Effect on Nursing Interventions and Healthcare Outcomes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160063
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Residence on Multiple Units During Hospitalization: The Effect on Nursing Interventions and Healthcare Outcomes
Abstract:
Residence on Multiple Units During Hospitalization: The Effect on Nursing Interventions and Healthcare Outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Kanak, Mary, PhDc, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Title:Graduate Research Assistant
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 1954 Holiday Road, Coralville, IA, 52241, USA
Contact Telephone:319-338-9018
Co-Authors:Shever Leah, BSN, RN; Marita Titler, PhD, RN, FAAN, Director; Qiang Fei, MA; Joanne Dochterman, PhD, RN, FAAN; and Debra Picone, PhD, RN
Purpose: To describe the effect of being cared for in multiple inpatient units on 1) nursing interventions, 2) resource use, and 3) healthcare outcomes. Conceptual Framework: Consisted of an effectiveness outcomes model developed by Titler (2000) for use in a primary study examining predictors of patient outcomes. Subjects: Sample consisted of 7,851 patients, >59 years old, hospitalized at a Midwest medical center and at risk for falling. Methods: Data were extracted from a data repository of a primary study on nursing outcomes effectiveness research. The independent variable was the number of units on which the patient resided during hospitalization. Dependent variables were 1) use rates for nursing interventions of Patient Teaching and Discharge Planning, 2) resource use defined by length of stay and hospital cost, and 3) health care outcomes of nosocomial infection, adverse occurrence, mortality, fall, medication error, and discharge disposition. Primary and comorbid medical diagnoses, and severity of illness were control variables. Data were analyzed using general linear models for continuous variables and logistic regression for dichotomous variables. Results: Number of units per hospitalization was significantly associated (p < .001) with all dependent variables except mortality. As the number of units increased, frequency of use for Patient Teaching and Discharge Planning decreased. An increasing number of units were associated with increased length of stay, hospital costs, nosocomial infections, adverse occurrences, falls, and medication errors. As the number of units increased, odds of being discharged to home decreased. Conclusions: Findings suggest that, although patients are often transferred across multiple units for medical reasons, motivation for transfer should be carefully considered. When patients must be transferred, nurses need to ensure that continuity of care, achievement of desired outcomes, and efficient utilization of resources are not compromised.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleResidence on Multiple Units During Hospitalization: The Effect on Nursing Interventions and Healthcare Outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160063-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Residence on Multiple Units During Hospitalization: The Effect on Nursing Interventions and Healthcare Outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kanak, Mary, PhDc, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Graduate Research Assistant</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 1954 Holiday Road, Coralville, IA, 52241, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">319-338-9018</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">maryfkanak@aol.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Shever Leah, BSN, RN; Marita Titler, PhD, RN, FAAN, Director; Qiang Fei, MA; Joanne Dochterman, PhD, RN, FAAN; and Debra Picone, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To describe the effect of being cared for in multiple inpatient units on 1) nursing interventions, 2) resource use, and 3) healthcare outcomes. Conceptual Framework: Consisted of an effectiveness outcomes model developed by Titler (2000) for use in a primary study examining predictors of patient outcomes. Subjects: Sample consisted of 7,851 patients, &gt;59 years old, hospitalized at a Midwest medical center and at risk for falling. Methods: Data were extracted from a data repository of a primary study on nursing outcomes effectiveness research. The independent variable was the number of units on which the patient resided during hospitalization. Dependent variables were 1) use rates for nursing interventions of Patient Teaching and Discharge Planning, 2) resource use defined by length of stay and hospital cost, and 3) health care outcomes of nosocomial infection, adverse occurrence, mortality, fall, medication error, and discharge disposition. Primary and comorbid medical diagnoses, and severity of illness were control variables. Data were analyzed using general linear models for continuous variables and logistic regression for dichotomous variables. Results: Number of units per hospitalization was significantly associated (p &lt; .001) with all dependent variables except mortality. As the number of units increased, frequency of use for Patient Teaching and Discharge Planning decreased. An increasing number of units were associated with increased length of stay, hospital costs, nosocomial infections, adverse occurrences, falls, and medication errors. As the number of units increased, odds of being discharged to home decreased. Conclusions: Findings suggest that, although patients are often transferred across multiple units for medical reasons, motivation for transfer should be carefully considered. When patients must be transferred, nurses need to ensure that continuity of care, achievement of desired outcomes, and efficient utilization of resources are not compromised. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:35:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:35:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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