2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160067
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Mild Cognitive Impairment: Nursing's Role
Abstract:
Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Mild Cognitive Impairment: Nursing's Role
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Kirk, Laura, MS, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:Predoctoral Student
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 5717 Knox Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN, 55419, USA
Contact Telephone:612-928-3001
Mild cognitive impairment (MCI), the theorized intermediate stage on the cognitive continuum between normal cognitive aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD), is gaining prominence in the literature on dementia and dementia care. Although the prevalence and significance of affective neuropsyciatric symptoms in persons with AD has been well documented, less attention has been given to these symptoms in persons with MCI. Methods: A comprehensive review of the literature from the disciplines of nursing, medicine, and psychology was undertaken to elucidate the current state of the science on MCI, and to examine the prevalence of depression, anxiety, and apathy in persons with MCI. Key search terms included: mild cognitive impairment, preclinical Alzheimer's disease, prodromal Alzheimer's disease, depression, apathy, and anxiety. A data abstraction matrix, based on the method endorsed by Garrard (1999), was developed and utilized to abstract critical data in a uniform, consistent manner. Results: Though the rate of neuropsychiatric symptoms in persons with MCI varied across studies, such symptoms were highly prevalent in this population. Even the lowest rate found in this review is substantially higher than what is seen in a cognitively healthy population. This review confirms that depression is a common symptom in persons with MCI, with prevalence rates ranging from 12% to as much as 46%. Similarly, anxiety and apathy occurred in a significant proportion of persons with MCI, with rates ranging from 10-49% and 15-39% respectively. Implications: Affective neuropsychiatric symptoms produce a significant amount of distress, and are associated with considerable suffering and morbidity. The treatment of neuropsychiatric disturbance may lead to decreased neuropathology and substantial improvements in quality of life. Nurses are particularly well suited to provide education and support to this rapidly growing population. In so doing, nursing can do much to help alleviate the distressing emotions that surround issues of aging and dementia.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNeuropsychiatric Symptoms in Mild Cognitive Impairment: Nursing's Roleen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160067-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Mild Cognitive Impairment: Nursing's Role</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kirk, Laura, MS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Predoctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 5717 Knox Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN, 55419, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">612-928-3001</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kirk0013@umn.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Mild cognitive impairment (MCI), the theorized intermediate stage on the cognitive continuum between normal cognitive aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD), is gaining prominence in the literature on dementia and dementia care. Although the prevalence and significance of affective neuropsyciatric symptoms in persons with AD has been well documented, less attention has been given to these symptoms in persons with MCI. Methods: A comprehensive review of the literature from the disciplines of nursing, medicine, and psychology was undertaken to elucidate the current state of the science on MCI, and to examine the prevalence of depression, anxiety, and apathy in persons with MCI. Key search terms included: mild cognitive impairment, preclinical Alzheimer's disease, prodromal Alzheimer's disease, depression, apathy, and anxiety. A data abstraction matrix, based on the method endorsed by Garrard (1999), was developed and utilized to abstract critical data in a uniform, consistent manner. Results: Though the rate of neuropsychiatric symptoms in persons with MCI varied across studies, such symptoms were highly prevalent in this population. Even the lowest rate found in this review is substantially higher than what is seen in a cognitively healthy population. This review confirms that depression is a common symptom in persons with MCI, with prevalence rates ranging from 12% to as much as 46%. Similarly, anxiety and apathy occurred in a significant proportion of persons with MCI, with rates ranging from 10-49% and 15-39% respectively. Implications: Affective neuropsychiatric symptoms produce a significant amount of distress, and are associated with considerable suffering and morbidity. The treatment of neuropsychiatric disturbance may lead to decreased neuropathology and substantial improvements in quality of life. Nurses are particularly well suited to provide education and support to this rapidly growing population. In so doing, nursing can do much to help alleviate the distressing emotions that surround issues of aging and dementia.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:35:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:35:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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