2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160068
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patterns of Functioning in Families Having a Child with a Genetic Condition
Abstract:
Patterns of Functioning in Families Having a Child with a Genetic Condition
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Knafl, Kathleen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Oregon Health & Science University
Title:Associate Dean
Contact Address:Nursing Department, 3455 SW US Veterans Hospital Road, Portland, OR, 97205, USA
Contact Telephone:203/737-5060
Co-Authors:George J. Knafl, PhD; Agatha Gallo, PhD, RN, CPNP, Professor; and Denise Angst, DNSc, Director
Purpose: Recognizing the unique challenges of genetic conditions for parents and families, researchers have begun to study family response to a child's genetic condition. The purpose of this analysis was to identify patterns of family functioning based on couples' reports of satisfaction with family life and family hardiness.

Conceptual Framework: The report is based on an analysis of data from a study (Parents' Interpretation and Use of Genetic Information, R01HG/HD02036) of parents of children with varied genetic conditions (e.g. sickle cell disease, cystic fibrosis), which was guided by the Family Management Style Framework.

Sample: Data for this analysis came from a subset of 52 of the 86 families participating in the study. The subset consisted of families in which both spouses participated.

Methods: Parents individually completed the Family APGAR (a measure of satisfaction with family life) and the Family Hardiness Index (a measure of the family's internal strengths). Parents also completed structured measures of quality of life and child functional status. Cluster analysis was used to identify patterns of functioning.

Results: Five clusters were identified based on parents' scores on the measures of family functioning. Clusters differentiated both quality of family functioning and the extent to which parents had shared or discrepant perceptions of family life. The construct validity of clusters was supported by a significant relationship between cluster membership and parental quality of life and child functional status. There was no relationship between cluster membership and type of genetic condition.

Conclusions: By incorporating data from multiple family members and measuring multiple aspects of family life, the analysis provides a multifaceted understanding of family functioning in the context of a child's genetic condition. The absence of a relationship between cluster membership and genetic condition points to the appropriateness of taking a non-categorical approach when studying family response to genetic conditions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatterns of Functioning in Families Having a Child with a Genetic Conditionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160068-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Patterns of Functioning in Families Having a Child with a Genetic Condition</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Knafl, Kathleen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oregon Health &amp; Science University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Department, 3455 SW US Veterans Hospital Road, Portland, OR, 97205, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">203/737-5060</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">knaflk@ohsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">George J. Knafl, PhD; Agatha Gallo, PhD, RN, CPNP, Professor; and Denise Angst, DNSc, Director</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Recognizing the unique challenges of genetic conditions for parents and families, researchers have begun to study family response to a child's genetic condition. The purpose of this analysis was to identify patterns of family functioning based on couples' reports of satisfaction with family life and family hardiness. <br/><br/>Conceptual Framework: The report is based on an analysis of data from a study (Parents' Interpretation and Use of Genetic Information, R01HG/HD02036) of parents of children with varied genetic conditions (e.g. sickle cell disease, cystic fibrosis), which was guided by the Family Management Style Framework. <br/><br/>Sample: Data for this analysis came from a subset of 52 of the 86 families participating in the study. The subset consisted of families in which both spouses participated. <br/><br/>Methods: Parents individually completed the Family APGAR (a measure of satisfaction with family life) and the Family Hardiness Index (a measure of the family's internal strengths). Parents also completed structured measures of quality of life and child functional status. Cluster analysis was used to identify patterns of functioning. <br/><br/>Results: Five clusters were identified based on parents' scores on the measures of family functioning. Clusters differentiated both quality of family functioning and the extent to which parents had shared or discrepant perceptions of family life. The construct validity of clusters was supported by a significant relationship between cluster membership and parental quality of life and child functional status. There was no relationship between cluster membership and type of genetic condition. <br/><br/>Conclusions: By incorporating data from multiple family members and measuring multiple aspects of family life, the analysis provides a multifaceted understanding of family functioning in the context of a child's genetic condition. The absence of a relationship between cluster membership and genetic condition points to the appropriateness of taking a non-categorical approach when studying family response to genetic conditions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:35:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:35:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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