2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160070
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurse Practitioners and the Management of Moral Problems in Primary Care
Abstract:
Nurse Practitioners and the Management of Moral Problems in Primary Care
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Laabs, Carolyn, MSN, APRN, FNP
P.I. Institution Name:Rush University
Title:Family Nurse Practitioner
Contact Address:Community and Mental Health Nursing, 6645 Harvard Drive, Franklin, WI, 53132, USA
Contact Telephone:414-817-9077
Problem: Primary care presents distressful moral problems for NPs who report frustration, powerlessness, changing jobs, and leaving advanced practice. An understanding of how NPs deal with ethical issues and moral problems common to primary care is needed. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the process NPs use to manage moral problems common to primary care and to identify the strategies NPs use, the contexts that influence strategies, and the consequences for NPs. Design and Analysis: Using grounded theory methodology, a sample of 22 NPs was interviewed. Using a non-structured format, participants commented on hypothetical situations from the literature depicting ethical issues common to primary care. Substantive and theoretical coding was conducted using Atlas-ti 5.0. Findings: A theory of maintaining integrity emerged that consisted of the following phases: encountering conflict, drawing a line, finding a way without crossing the line, and evaluating actions. NPs varied not only in awareness and discord encountered in conflict but also in clarity, flexibility, and justifiability of the line drawn. Strategies used were balancing, informing, advocating, building relationships, and protecting self and were influenced by the values, experiences, role, and work environment of the NP. A critical juncture occurred when NPs evaluated how well integrity had been maintained. Some experienced no distress while others experienced self-doubt, lingering regret, and attempted to reconcile through avoidance, compensation, and self-convincement. Implications: Ethics education and support systems are needed to assist ethical discourse and decision-making among practicing NPs. Clarification of values, role, and the preferred model of the NP/patient relationship are needed to promote environments supportive of integrity.

Acknowledgements: Many thanks to Mary Johnson, Frank Hicks, Susan Swider, and Russell Burck for their valuable support. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurse Practitioners and the Management of Moral Problems in Primary Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160070-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurse Practitioners and the Management of Moral Problems in Primary Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Laabs, Carolyn, MSN, APRN, FNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Rush University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Family Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Community and Mental Health Nursing, 6645 Harvard Drive, Franklin, WI, 53132, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414-817-9077</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">claabs@wi.rr.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Primary care presents distressful moral problems for NPs who report frustration, powerlessness, changing jobs, and leaving advanced practice. An understanding of how NPs deal with ethical issues and moral problems common to primary care is needed. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the process NPs use to manage moral problems common to primary care and to identify the strategies NPs use, the contexts that influence strategies, and the consequences for NPs. Design and Analysis: Using grounded theory methodology, a sample of 22 NPs was interviewed. Using a non-structured format, participants commented on hypothetical situations from the literature depicting ethical issues common to primary care. Substantive and theoretical coding was conducted using Atlas-ti 5.0. Findings: A theory of maintaining integrity emerged that consisted of the following phases: encountering conflict, drawing a line, finding a way without crossing the line, and evaluating actions. NPs varied not only in awareness and discord encountered in conflict but also in clarity, flexibility, and justifiability of the line drawn. Strategies used were balancing, informing, advocating, building relationships, and protecting self and were influenced by the values, experiences, role, and work environment of the NP. A critical juncture occurred when NPs evaluated how well integrity had been maintained. Some experienced no distress while others experienced self-doubt, lingering regret, and attempted to reconcile through avoidance, compensation, and self-convincement. Implications: Ethics education and support systems are needed to assist ethical discourse and decision-making among practicing NPs. Clarification of values, role, and the preferred model of the NP/patient relationship are needed to promote environments supportive of integrity. <br/><br/>Acknowledgements: Many thanks to Mary Johnson, Frank Hicks, Susan Swider, and Russell Burck for their valuable support. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:35:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:35:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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