2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160074
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of Aspartame Consumption on Cognitive Function
Abstract:
Effects of Aspartame Consumption on Cognitive Function
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Lindseth, Glenda, PhD, MS, RN, FADA
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Dakota
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Box 9025, Grand Forks, ND, 58201, USA
Contact Telephone:701-777-4506
Co-Authors:Fang Ye, BSN, RN, Graduate Research Assistant; Thomas Petros, PhD, Professor; and Debra Fossum, RD, BS, Instructor
Problem and Purpose: The FDA estimates that 35% of Americans regularly consume aspartame, an artificial sweetener used in diet drinks and other sugar-free food items. Some anecdotal reports indicate the substance has been associated with health, behavioral and cognitive concerns while the FDA (2004) and other food regulatory agencies indicate it is safe for use up to 50mg/kg/day. They further advise individuals with metabolic phenylalanine disorders not to consume this product. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to examine the effects of aspartame consumption on cognitive functioning of healthy adults.

Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: Orem's theory of Self-Care guides this descriptive, clinical study. The effect of dietary aspartame consumption on cognitive function of study participants is monitored and analyzed for participants consuming weighed food intakes for 16 days.

Methodology and Design: This study tests the hypothesis that cognitive function is poorer when participants' dietary intake of aspartame is higher. The sample population is comprised of 60 randomly selected ethnically-diverse 20-40 year old healthy adults recruited through a midwestern university. Instruments used for measurement include a Demographic Questionnaire, Weighed Food Intakes, Kearney and Fleischer's Exercise of Self-care Agency (alpha=.80), the Sternberg Item Recognition Test (r=.95), and the Vandenberg Mental Rotation Test (KR=.88).

Plan for Analysis: Demographic, nutritional, and self-care agency variables are being analyzed for relationships to cognitive function scores through the use of descriptive statistics and multiple regression analysis.

Relevance: Nurses need to be aware of dietary factors that can maximize cognitive function and promote quality of life for their clients.

This study is conducted as part of a research grant funded by the US Army Biomedical Research Command # DAMD17-03-1-0010. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of Aspartame Consumption on Cognitive Functionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160074-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of Aspartame Consumption on Cognitive Function</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lindseth, Glenda, PhD, MS, RN, FADA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Dakota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Box 9025, Grand Forks, ND, 58201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">701-777-4506</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Glenda.Lindseth@mail.und.nodak.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Fang Ye, BSN, RN, Graduate Research Assistant; Thomas Petros, PhD, Professor; and Debra Fossum, RD, BS, Instructor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem and Purpose: The FDA estimates that 35% of Americans regularly consume aspartame, an artificial sweetener used in diet drinks and other sugar-free food items. Some anecdotal reports indicate the substance has been associated with health, behavioral and cognitive concerns while the FDA (2004) and other food regulatory agencies indicate it is safe for use up to 50mg/kg/day. They further advise individuals with metabolic phenylalanine disorders not to consume this product. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to examine the effects of aspartame consumption on cognitive functioning of healthy adults. <br/><br/>Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: Orem's theory of Self-Care guides this descriptive, clinical study. The effect of dietary aspartame consumption on cognitive function of study participants is monitored and analyzed for participants consuming weighed food intakes for 16 days. <br/><br/>Methodology and Design: This study tests the hypothesis that cognitive function is poorer when participants' dietary intake of aspartame is higher. The sample population is comprised of 60 randomly selected ethnically-diverse 20-40 year old healthy adults recruited through a midwestern university. Instruments used for measurement include a Demographic Questionnaire, Weighed Food Intakes, Kearney and Fleischer's Exercise of Self-care Agency (alpha=.80), the Sternberg Item Recognition Test (r=.95), and the Vandenberg Mental Rotation Test (KR=.88). <br/><br/>Plan for Analysis: Demographic, nutritional, and self-care agency variables are being analyzed for relationships to cognitive function scores through the use of descriptive statistics and multiple regression analysis.<br/><br/>Relevance: Nurses need to be aware of dietary factors that can maximize cognitive function and promote quality of life for their clients.<br/><br/>This study is conducted as part of a research grant funded by the US Army Biomedical Research Command # DAMD17-03-1-0010. [Poster Presentation]<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:36:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:36:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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