2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160075
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hidden limitations: Women's experiences of coping with functional decline
Abstract:
Hidden limitations: Women's experiences of coping with functional decline
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Lorenz, Rebecca, PhDc, MHS, BSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Louis University
Title:Principal Investigator
Contact Address:Nursing Department, 2245 Delaware Drive, St. Charles, MO, 63303, USA
Contact Telephone:636-928-5974
Older adults are aware of physical deterioration before the development of overt functional limitations. Physical deterioration continues to progress and is rarely reported to health care professionals until older adults' self-sufficiency is threatened. This delay in recognizing the loss of bodily capacities results in missed opportunities for health professionals to intervene early and delay the onset of disability. The purpose of this study was to describe how older women cope with functional limitations in order to care for themselves and their families, and to remain engaged in meaningful activities.

The philosophical approach for this study was interpretive phenomenology, which includes the assumption that humans are embodied agents. The focus on embodiment provided access to ordinarily taken-for-granted bodily skills and meanings and revealed how older women cope with the onset of functional decline.

Twelve community-dwelling women (60-80 y/o), who reported no difficulty with daily activities, participated in repeated interviews and observations conducted on at least 4 occasions over 6 months. Ethnographic techniques were included to examine the daily lives of older women over time. Interpretive strategies, including identification of paradigm cases and themes, were used to analyze narrative data.

This paper will describe how successful coping practices often obscured participants' functional disability. Because these older women had developed new bodily skills to cope with loss of strength and other bodily changes, their functional limitations were often invisible. Although these older women remained independent, they often struggled with daily tasks and meaningful activities. Implications of these findings for nursing practice and future research are described. Funded by NINR - 5F31NR008985-02
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHidden limitations: Women's experiences of coping with functional declineen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160075-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hidden limitations: Women's experiences of coping with functional decline</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lorenz, Rebecca, PhDc, MHS, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Louis University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Principal Investigator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Department, 2245 Delaware Drive, St. Charles, MO, 63303, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">636-928-5974</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">beckylorenz@charter.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Older adults are aware of physical deterioration before the development of overt functional limitations. Physical deterioration continues to progress and is rarely reported to health care professionals until older adults' self-sufficiency is threatened. This delay in recognizing the loss of bodily capacities results in missed opportunities for health professionals to intervene early and delay the onset of disability. The purpose of this study was to describe how older women cope with functional limitations in order to care for themselves and their families, and to remain engaged in meaningful activities. <br/><br/>The philosophical approach for this study was interpretive phenomenology, which includes the assumption that humans are embodied agents. The focus on embodiment provided access to ordinarily taken-for-granted bodily skills and meanings and revealed how older women cope with the onset of functional decline. <br/><br/>Twelve community-dwelling women (60-80 y/o), who reported no difficulty with daily activities, participated in repeated interviews and observations conducted on at least 4 occasions over 6 months. Ethnographic techniques were included to examine the daily lives of older women over time. Interpretive strategies, including identification of paradigm cases and themes, were used to analyze narrative data. <br/><br/>This paper will describe how successful coping practices often obscured participants' functional disability. Because these older women had developed new bodily skills to cope with loss of strength and other bodily changes, their functional limitations were often invisible. Although these older women remained independent, they often struggled with daily tasks and meaningful activities. Implications of these findings for nursing practice and future research are described. Funded by NINR - 5F31NR008985-02</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:36:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:36:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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