Harmful Drinking, Depression, and Conduct Disorder Among Females Involved in Alcohol-Related Motor Vehicle Crashes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160077
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Harmful Drinking, Depression, and Conduct Disorder Among Females Involved in Alcohol-Related Motor Vehicle Crashes
Abstract:
Harmful Drinking, Depression, and Conduct Disorder Among Females Involved in Alcohol-Related Motor Vehicle Crashes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Mangold, Fatin, PhD, MA, BA
P.I. Institution Name:Jordan University of Science & Technology
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Nursing Department, P.O. Box 3030, Irbid, 22110, Jordan
Contact Telephone:513 558-5268
Co-Authors:Marilyn S. Sommers, PhD, RN, Associate Dean for Research and Glenn Kent, MS, Predoctoral Student
Purpose: To determine the relationship among alcohol consumption and two psychological variables (depression, conduct disorder) in female drinkers who have been involved in an alcohol-related motor vehicle crash (ARMVC). Theoretical framework: Wilsnack's conceptual model of "causes and consequences of problem drinking among women" was used to determine which variables to include in the study. Subjects: The sample included 43 females, 18 to 45 years old, with a mean age of 28.84 years (SD = 7.10), who were enrolled in a brief intervention study conducted to test the effect of brief intervention to reduce alcohol consumption. Method: A secondary analysis was performed using data from a brief intervention trial. Data were collected using a Health Screening Survey, and included instruments to assess for conduct disorder before and after age 15 and depression both in the previous year and in a life time. Alcohol consumption was calculated using the Timeline FollowBack method (TLFB). Multiple regression analysis was conducted to assess the relationship between the psychological factors of interest and average drinks/drinking day Results: Depression in a life time, conduct disorder after age 15, and age significantly explained 25% of the variance in the average drinks/drinking day (F = 4.45, p< .05, R2= .25). Depression in a life time significantly contributed the most to the variance in the average number of drinks/drinking day (37%) followed by age and conduct disorder after age 15. Conclusion: In the study population, younger females with a history of conduct disorder and depression consumed more alcohol than their older counterparts. Although more work is needed, when young females screen positive for depression or conduct disorder, alcohol screening is also important.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHarmful Drinking, Depression, and Conduct Disorder Among Females Involved in Alcohol-Related Motor Vehicle Crashesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160077-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Harmful Drinking, Depression, and Conduct Disorder Among Females Involved in Alcohol-Related Motor Vehicle Crashes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mangold, Fatin, PhD, MA, BA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Jordan University of Science &amp; Technology</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Department, P.O. Box 3030, Irbid, 22110, Jordan</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">513 558-5268</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">fatin253@excite.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marilyn S. Sommers, PhD, RN, Associate Dean for Research and Glenn Kent, MS, Predoctoral Student</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To determine the relationship among alcohol consumption and two psychological variables (depression, conduct disorder) in female drinkers who have been involved in an alcohol-related motor vehicle crash (ARMVC). Theoretical framework: Wilsnack's conceptual model of &quot;causes and consequences of problem drinking among women&quot; was used to determine which variables to include in the study. Subjects: The sample included 43 females, 18 to 45 years old, with a mean age of 28.84 years (SD = 7.10), who were enrolled in a brief intervention study conducted to test the effect of brief intervention to reduce alcohol consumption. Method: A secondary analysis was performed using data from a brief intervention trial. Data were collected using a Health Screening Survey, and included instruments to assess for conduct disorder before and after age 15 and depression both in the previous year and in a life time. Alcohol consumption was calculated using the Timeline FollowBack method (TLFB). Multiple regression analysis was conducted to assess the relationship between the psychological factors of interest and average drinks/drinking day Results: Depression in a life time, conduct disorder after age 15, and age significantly explained 25% of the variance in the average drinks/drinking day (F = 4.45, p&lt; .05, R2= .25). Depression in a life time significantly contributed the most to the variance in the average number of drinks/drinking day (37%) followed by age and conduct disorder after age 15. Conclusion: In the study population, younger females with a history of conduct disorder and depression consumed more alcohol than their older counterparts. Although more work is needed, when young females screen positive for depression or conduct disorder, alcohol screening is also important. <br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:36:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:36:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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