Perceived Challenges in Lay Efforts to Accurately Label Evolving Symptoms of Myocardial Infarction (MI)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160079
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceived Challenges in Lay Efforts to Accurately Label Evolving Symptoms of Myocardial Infarction (MI)
Abstract:
Perceived Challenges in Lay Efforts to Accurately Label Evolving Symptoms of Myocardial Infarction (MI)
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Martin, Rene, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Adult/Gerontology Nursing, 374 Nursing Building, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA
Contact Telephone:319-335-3609
Co-Authors:Katherine Barnett, BA, Research Assistant; Nicole Petsas Blodgett, MSN, Predoctoral Student; Ju Young Shin, MSN, Predoctoral Student; and James Bunde, PhDc, BA
PURPOSE: Laypeople who accurately label MI symptoms as cardiac seek treatment quickly, reducing mortality/morbidity. However, most who experience MI mislabel their symptoms and delay seeking care. We explored post-MI patients' perceptions of factors that challenged them in accurately labeling symptoms.

CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK: Leventhal's self-regulatory model of illness provided the context for this subsidiary analysis; the model posits that symptom labels and other beliefs about the meaning and implications of symptoms guide self-care behaviors, including seeking treatment.

SUBJECTS: Participants from a broader study of MI treatment seeking behavior were included in subsidiary analyses if they had experienced a first MI and had attributed their symptoms to some non-cardiac cause prior to hospitalization (N = 221; 66% male).

METHODS: Participants were asked whether symptoms had been similar to their beliefs about MI; if not, they described how symptoms had differed from expectations. Narrative responses were recorded and transcribed. Responses were Q-sorted into conceptual categories by six expert raters in order to construct a coding system to capture how symptoms were perceived to be different from expectations (e.g., type, duration). Finally, narratives were coded by independent raters, with excellent inter-rater reliability (Ks >.90).

RESULTS: Most participants (87%) reported symptoms differed from their prior beliefs about MI, with women (95%) being more likely than men (83%) to describe expectancy violations, p = .02. The most common unexpected aspect was type of symptoms experienced (67%). A sizable minority (37%) said their experience of chest pain was less incapacitating than their MI-related beliefs had led them to anticipate.

CONCLUSIONS: This in-depth exploration of MI symptom experiences provides rich information for the development of interventions designed facilitate rapid treatment seeking in response to MI symptoms. Findings suggest that interventions should emphasize the potential range and variability of both type and severity of MI symptoms, especially among women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceived Challenges in Lay Efforts to Accurately Label Evolving Symptoms of Myocardial Infarction (MI)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160079-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perceived Challenges in Lay Efforts to Accurately Label Evolving Symptoms of Myocardial Infarction (MI)</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Martin, Rene, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Adult/Gerontology Nursing, 374 Nursing Building, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">319-335-3609</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rene-martin@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Katherine Barnett, BA, Research Assistant; Nicole Petsas Blodgett, MSN, Predoctoral Student; Ju Young Shin, MSN, Predoctoral Student; and James Bunde, PhDc, BA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: Laypeople who accurately label MI symptoms as cardiac seek treatment quickly, reducing mortality/morbidity. However, most who experience MI mislabel their symptoms and delay seeking care. We explored post-MI patients' perceptions of factors that challenged them in accurately labeling symptoms.<br/><br/>CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK: Leventhal's self-regulatory model of illness provided the context for this subsidiary analysis; the model posits that symptom labels and other beliefs about the meaning and implications of symptoms guide self-care behaviors, including seeking treatment.<br/><br/>SUBJECTS: Participants from a broader study of MI treatment seeking behavior were included in subsidiary analyses if they had experienced a first MI and had attributed their symptoms to some non-cardiac cause prior to hospitalization (N = 221; 66% male).<br/><br/>METHODS: Participants were asked whether symptoms had been similar to their beliefs about MI; if not, they described how symptoms had differed from expectations. Narrative responses were recorded and transcribed. Responses were Q-sorted into conceptual categories by six expert raters in order to construct a coding system to capture how symptoms were perceived to be different from expectations (e.g., type, duration). Finally, narratives were coded by independent raters, with excellent inter-rater reliability (Ks &gt;.90).<br/><br/>RESULTS: Most participants (87%) reported symptoms differed from their prior beliefs about MI, with women (95%) being more likely than men (83%) to describe expectancy violations, p = .02. The most common unexpected aspect was type of symptoms experienced (67%). A sizable minority (37%) said their experience of chest pain was less incapacitating than their MI-related beliefs had led them to anticipate.<br/><br/>CONCLUSIONS: This in-depth exploration of MI symptom experiences provides rich information for the development of interventions designed facilitate rapid treatment seeking in response to MI symptoms. Findings suggest that interventions should emphasize the potential range and variability of both type and severity of MI symptoms, especially among women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:36:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:36:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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