2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160080
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Utilizing Peer Drama as Primary Prevention for Teen Dating Violence
Abstract:
Utilizing Peer Drama as Primary Prevention for Teen Dating Violence
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Mascolo, Karen, MSN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:Akron Children's Hospital
Title:Director
Contact Address:School Health Services, One Perkins Square, Akron, OH, 44308, USA
Contact Telephone:330-543-3807
Co-Authors:Paula R. Renker, PhD, Assistant Professor
Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive pilot study was to examine high school students' perceptions and experiences related to dating violence before and after a presentation including peer presented domestic violence vignettes, structured didactic content, and a resource panel of community leaders.

Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: This study was based upon Heise's Ecological Framework that incorporates personal, situational, and socio-cultural factors to explain the etiology of violence against women.

Subjects: 161 senior level students at a suburban high school.

Method: After parental informed consent and student informed assent was obtained, 200 high school seniors from a suburban high school attended a presentation on dating violence. Students completed pre and post-tests to measure any changes in knowledge, perceptions and attitudes regarding dating violence. While no names were used, the students were asked to supply the last three digits of their student identification number for tracking purposes. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and the McNemar test.

Results: While overall students did not endorse violence myths e.g. "Only 'easy' girls have trouble with dating violence," there were significant differences in the pre-test responses between male and female students. In the post-test the significant differences were reduced or eliminated. Over 85% of the students supported the overall program and the use of peer drama to present information about dating violence. While 14% responded that they were involved in a violent dating relationship, 90% reported relationship violence was a problem in their school. Student feedback suggested that dating violence programs should begin in 9th grade.

Conclusions: Students acknowledged that violence programs are important and they are interested in learning about dating violence. Based on student feedback, the program is effective, however further research is needed to develop age appropriate information for all high school students.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUtilizing Peer Drama as Primary Prevention for Teen Dating Violenceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160080-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Utilizing Peer Drama as Primary Prevention for Teen Dating Violence</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mascolo, Karen, MSN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Akron Children's Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School Health Services, One Perkins Square, Akron, OH, 44308, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330-543-3807</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kmascolo@chmca.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Paula R. Renker, PhD, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive pilot study was to examine high school students' perceptions and experiences related to dating violence before and after a presentation including peer presented domestic violence vignettes, structured didactic content, and a resource panel of community leaders. <br/><br/>Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: This study was based upon Heise's Ecological Framework that incorporates personal, situational, and socio-cultural factors to explain the etiology of violence against women. <br/><br/>Subjects: 161 senior level students at a suburban high school.<br/><br/>Method: After parental informed consent and student informed assent was obtained, 200 high school seniors from a suburban high school attended a presentation on dating violence. Students completed pre and post-tests to measure any changes in knowledge, perceptions and attitudes regarding dating violence. While no names were used, the students were asked to supply the last three digits of their student identification number for tracking purposes. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and the McNemar test.<br/><br/>Results: While overall students did not endorse violence myths e.g. &quot;Only 'easy' girls have trouble with dating violence,&quot; there were significant differences in the pre-test responses between male and female students. In the post-test the significant differences were reduced or eliminated. Over 85% of the students supported the overall program and the use of peer drama to present information about dating violence. While 14% responded that they were involved in a violent dating relationship, 90% reported relationship violence was a problem in their school. Student feedback suggested that dating violence programs should begin in 9th grade.<br/><br/>Conclusions: Students acknowledged that violence programs are important and they are interested in learning about dating violence. Based on student feedback, the program is effective, however further research is needed to develop age appropriate information for all high school students.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:36:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:36:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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