Impact of Brain Temperature and Core Temperature on Intracranial Pressure and Cerebral Perfusion Pressure in Acutely Injured Neurological Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160082
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of Brain Temperature and Core Temperature on Intracranial Pressure and Cerebral Perfusion Pressure in Acutely Injured Neurological Patients
Abstract:
Impact of Brain Temperature and Core Temperature on Intracranial Pressure and Cerebral Perfusion Pressure in Acutely Injured Neurological Patients
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:McIlvoy, Laura, PhD, RN, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University Southeast
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, 1661 Silver Creek Drive, New Albany, IN, 47150, USA
Contact Telephone:812-941-2223
Hyperthermia has been demonstrated to increase neuronal injury when present during or after an acute brain injury. Core temperature has traditionally been used to diagnose hyperthermia with the assumption that core temperature equals brain temperature in the population of acute brain injury. If the temperature of an injured brain is higher than core temperature, episodes of neural hyperthermia may go undetected. The objectives of this study were to 1) determine if differences exist between brain temperature and core temperature in subjects with acute neurological injuries and 2) investigate the impact of brain and core temperatures on intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). The study was conducted through a retrospective chart audit of patients 18 years of age or older admitted to a Level I Trauma Center with a diagnosis of brain injury whose condition warranted placement of pulmonary artery and intraventricular catheters. Thirty-one charts contained complete data; nine charts provided partial data (23 trauma and 17 strokes). There were 117 charts inspected that had ICP recorded but no brain temperature recorded, even though a space to record the number was pre-printed on the critical care nursing flowsheet. Mean brain temperature (100.8 degrees F, SD =0.69) was found to be significantly higher than mean core temperature (100.2 degrees F, SD = 0.74) ( (t (30) = -13, p = .00 (two-tailed), d=.80). Brain temperature means were hyperthermic (greater than or equal to 100.9 degrees F) while matching core temperatures were normothermic in almost a third of the subjects. There was no significant difference found between hyperthermic ICP or CPP and normothermic ICP or CPP determined by brain or core temperature. Future research is needed with prospectively collected data of adequate sample size to continue to investigate the impact of core and brain temperature on the intracranial dynamics of ICP and CPP.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of Brain Temperature and Core Temperature on Intracranial Pressure and Cerebral Perfusion Pressure in Acutely Injured Neurological Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160082-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Impact of Brain Temperature and Core Temperature on Intracranial Pressure and Cerebral Perfusion Pressure in Acutely Injured Neurological Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McIlvoy, Laura, PhD, RN, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University Southeast</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, 1661 Silver Creek Drive, New Albany, IN, 47150, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">812-941-2223</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lmcilvoy@att.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Hyperthermia has been demonstrated to increase neuronal injury when present during or after an acute brain injury. Core temperature has traditionally been used to diagnose hyperthermia with the assumption that core temperature equals brain temperature in the population of acute brain injury. If the temperature of an injured brain is higher than core temperature, episodes of neural hyperthermia may go undetected. The objectives of this study were to 1) determine if differences exist between brain temperature and core temperature in subjects with acute neurological injuries and 2) investigate the impact of brain and core temperatures on intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). The study was conducted through a retrospective chart audit of patients 18 years of age or older admitted to a Level I Trauma Center with a diagnosis of brain injury whose condition warranted placement of pulmonary artery and intraventricular catheters. Thirty-one charts contained complete data; nine charts provided partial data (23 trauma and 17 strokes). There were 117 charts inspected that had ICP recorded but no brain temperature recorded, even though a space to record the number was pre-printed on the critical care nursing flowsheet. Mean brain temperature (100.8 degrees F, SD =0.69) was found to be significantly higher than mean core temperature (100.2 degrees F, SD = 0.74) ( (t (30) = -13, p = .00 (two-tailed), d=.80). Brain temperature means were hyperthermic (greater than or equal to 100.9 degrees F) while matching core temperatures were normothermic in almost a third of the subjects. There was no significant difference found between hyperthermic ICP or CPP and normothermic ICP or CPP determined by brain or core temperature. Future research is needed with prospectively collected data of adequate sample size to continue to investigate the impact of core and brain temperature on the intracranial dynamics of ICP and CPP.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:36:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:36:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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