2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160083
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationship Between Gastric Residual Volume and Aspiration
Abstract:
Relationship Between Gastric Residual Volume and Aspiration
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Metheny, Norma, PhD, MSN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Louis University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:Medical-Surgical Nursing, 3525 Caroline Mall, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA
Contact Telephone:314-977-8941
Purpose: This descriptive study sought to determine if gastric residual volume (GRV) threshold values used in clinical practice are associated with aspiration. Background: Lack of agreement about specific GRV threshold values interferes with the delivery of enteral feedings. Fewer than the prescribed number of calories is often delivered because of a fear that high gastric residual volumes will cause aspiration. Sample: A total of 2,643 GRV measurements were made in 185 critically ill adult patients receiving continuous gastric feedings. Eighty-two were fed through 14-18 Fr sump tubes and 103 were fed through 10 Fr polyurethane tubes. Method: GRV measurements were made five times each day for up to three days. Tracheal secretions were assayed for pepsin; if present, the patient was said to have aspirated gastric contents. Patients were categorized as having low GRVs (consistently <100 ml) or high GRVs (defined as two or more greater than or equal to:100 ml, 150 ml or 200 ml). Comparisons were made between the percent of pepsin-positive tracheal secretions (PPTS) in patients in the low GRV group and those in the higher GRV groups. Differences were assessed by the Mann-Whitney U test and the independent t-test. Results: Patients in the low GRV group (n=98) had a relatively high percent of PPTS (33.6 not equal to 2.5). However, the 20 patients who had two or more GRVs greater than or equal to 200 ml had a significantly greater percent of PPTS (49.3 not equal to 5.2, p = .01). The 37 patients with two or more GRVs greater than or equal to 150 ml also had a higher percent of PPTS (40.6 not equal to 4.2); however, the difference was not statistically significant (p=.07). Over two-thirds of the high GRVs were identified by large-diameter sump tubes. Conclusions: Low GRVs did not prevent aspiration. However, the incidence of aspiration was significantly increased when two or more GRVs greater than or equal to 200 ml were observed. Funded by NINR, R01 NR0 5007
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationship Between Gastric Residual Volume and Aspirationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160083-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationship Between Gastric Residual Volume and Aspiration</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Metheny, Norma, PhD, MSN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Louis University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Medical-Surgical Nursing, 3525 Caroline Mall, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">314-977-8941</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">methenna@slu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This descriptive study sought to determine if gastric residual volume (GRV) threshold values used in clinical practice are associated with aspiration. Background: Lack of agreement about specific GRV threshold values interferes with the delivery of enteral feedings. Fewer than the prescribed number of calories is often delivered because of a fear that high gastric residual volumes will cause aspiration. Sample: A total of 2,643 GRV measurements were made in 185 critically ill adult patients receiving continuous gastric feedings. Eighty-two were fed through 14-18 Fr sump tubes and 103 were fed through 10 Fr polyurethane tubes. Method: GRV measurements were made five times each day for up to three days. Tracheal secretions were assayed for pepsin; if present, the patient was said to have aspirated gastric contents. Patients were categorized as having low GRVs (consistently &lt;100 ml) or high GRVs (defined as two or more greater than or equal to:100 ml, 150 ml or 200 ml). Comparisons were made between the percent of pepsin-positive tracheal secretions (PPTS) in patients in the low GRV group and those in the higher GRV groups. Differences were assessed by the Mann-Whitney U test and the independent t-test. Results: Patients in the low GRV group (n=98) had a relatively high percent of PPTS (33.6 not equal to 2.5). However, the 20 patients who had two or more GRVs greater than or equal to 200 ml had a significantly greater percent of PPTS (49.3 not equal to 5.2, p = .01). The 37 patients with two or more GRVs greater than or equal to 150 ml also had a higher percent of PPTS (40.6 not equal to 4.2); however, the difference was not statistically significant (p=.07). Over two-thirds of the high GRVs were identified by large-diameter sump tubes. Conclusions: Low GRVs did not prevent aspiration. However, the incidence of aspiration was significantly increased when two or more GRVs greater than or equal to 200 ml were observed. Funded by NINR, R01 NR0 5007</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:36:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:36:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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