Embarrassment Linked to Quality of Life Outcomes for Veterans with Intestinal Ostomies

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160084
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Embarrassment Linked to Quality of Life Outcomes for Veterans with Intestinal Ostomies
Abstract:
Embarrassment Linked to Quality of Life Outcomes for Veterans with Intestinal Ostomies
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Mitchell, Kimberly, MS, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Francis Medical Center College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Nursing Department, 511 NE Greenleaf, Peoria, IL, 61603, USA
Contact Telephone:3096552183
Co-Authors:Susan M. Rawl, PhD, RN, C; Max Schmidt, MD, PhD; Marcia Grant, RN, DNSc, FAAN; Clifford Ko, MD; Carol M Baldwin, PhD, RN; Christopher Wendel, MS; Sara Hickey, MPH; Norma Bangel, RN; and Robert S Krouse, MD
Nationally, over 600,000 people live with intestinal stomas (ostomies) and 75,000 ostomy surgeries are performed each year. Embarrassment is a major issue for a large number of people with ostomies. The aim of this study was to identify the demographic and clinical variables related to embarrassment for people living with ostomies. Lazarus's model of stress and coping was the conceptual framework used. Participants were veterans (n=235) with a colostomy/ileostomy from three large urban areas. Using a case control design, quantitative data were obtained using the Modified City of Hope Quality of Life for Ostomates Survey and the SF-36V. The response rate was 51%. Qualitatively, participants were asked to describe the greatest challenge of living with an ostomy. Results indicated that 26% had high embarrassment, 26% moderate, and 48% had low to no embarrassment caused by their ostomy. The group who reported high embarrassment was compared to those with low embarrassment. Veterans who were highly embarrassed had higher anxiety (p<.01), higher depression (p<.01), lower satisfaction with their appearance (p<.01), greater difficulty meeting new people (p<.01), felt more isolated (p<.01), and reported lower overall quality of life (p<.01) compared to those with low embarrassment. Married/partnered veterans were significantly less embarrassed by their ostomy than non-partnered (p<.01). Embarrassment was mentioned as one of the greatest challenges of having an ostomy. Etiologies of embarrassment included gas, odor, leakage, and noise in social situations. Overall, feelings of embarrassment were significantly related to numerous dimensions of quality of life for people living with ostomies. Results of the study will guide the development of interventions to support and educate people with ostomies in order to manage embarrassment and improve quality of life.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmbarrassment Linked to Quality of Life Outcomes for Veterans with Intestinal Ostomiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160084-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Embarrassment Linked to Quality of Life Outcomes for Veterans with Intestinal Ostomies</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mitchell, Kimberly, MS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Francis Medical Center College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Department, 511 NE Greenleaf, Peoria, IL, 61603, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">3096552183</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kamitch@insightbb.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susan M. Rawl, PhD, RN, C; Max Schmidt, MD, PhD; Marcia Grant, RN, DNSc, FAAN; Clifford Ko, MD; Carol M Baldwin, PhD, RN; Christopher Wendel, MS; Sara Hickey, MPH; Norma Bangel, RN; and Robert S Krouse, MD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nationally, over 600,000 people live with intestinal stomas (ostomies) and 75,000 ostomy surgeries are performed each year. Embarrassment is a major issue for a large number of people with ostomies. The aim of this study was to identify the demographic and clinical variables related to embarrassment for people living with ostomies. Lazarus's model of stress and coping was the conceptual framework used. Participants were veterans (n=235) with a colostomy/ileostomy from three large urban areas. Using a case control design, quantitative data were obtained using the Modified City of Hope Quality of Life for Ostomates Survey and the SF-36V. The response rate was 51%. Qualitatively, participants were asked to describe the greatest challenge of living with an ostomy. Results indicated that 26% had high embarrassment, 26% moderate, and 48% had low to no embarrassment caused by their ostomy. The group who reported high embarrassment was compared to those with low embarrassment. Veterans who were highly embarrassed had higher anxiety (p&lt;.01), higher depression (p&lt;.01), lower satisfaction with their appearance (p&lt;.01), greater difficulty meeting new people (p&lt;.01), felt more isolated (p&lt;.01), and reported lower overall quality of life (p&lt;.01) compared to those with low embarrassment. Married/partnered veterans were significantly less embarrassed by their ostomy than non-partnered (p&lt;.01). Embarrassment was mentioned as one of the greatest challenges of having an ostomy. Etiologies of embarrassment included gas, odor, leakage, and noise in social situations. Overall, feelings of embarrassment were significantly related to numerous dimensions of quality of life for people living with ostomies. Results of the study will guide the development of interventions to support and educate people with ostomies in order to manage embarrassment and improve quality of life.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:36:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:36:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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