I Take my Pills and Do What I Have to Do: HIV-Infected Women's Successes with Medication Adherence

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160086
Type:
Presentation
Title:
I Take my Pills and Do What I Have to Do: HIV-Infected Women's Successes with Medication Adherence
Abstract:
I Take my Pills and Do What I Have to Do: HIV-Infected Women's Successes with Medication Adherence
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Morton-Miller, Amy, MS, RN, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
Title:Graduate Research Assistant
Contact Address:College of Nursing, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA
Contact Telephone:414/229-5817
Co-Authors:Sandra K. Plach, PhD, RN, CCRN, Assistant Professor and Patricia E Stevens, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor
Highly Active Antiretroviral Treatment (HAART) has been a major breakthrough in the treatment of HIV, but requires strict adherence (as high as 95%) to suppress viral replication and reduce destruction of CD4 cells. In this longitudinal qualitative study, using a feminist narrative approach, we investigated the HAART-related experiences of 55 HIV-infected women who narrated their lives in ten interviews over two years. In this presentation we share findings about women's successes adhering to HAART. Participants were recruited from both urban (75%) and rural (25%) areas. More than half were African American (53%), 36% Caucasian, 7% Hispanic, and 4% Native American. Average age was 41. Average annual income was $10,463 (SD $6902). Eight (14%) had asymptomatic HIV, 28 (51%) symptomatic HIV, and 19 (35%) AIDS. Transcripts were managed using N-vivo computer software. A multi-staged narrative analysis was the primary analytic approach. Results suggest that making a conscious self-commitment to take medications, no matter how much they hated having HIV, was fundamental to individuals' ability to integrate HAART into their lives. Returning to this core of self-determination made it possible to withstand doubts, disturbances, and discomforts entailed in adhering to such difficult regimens. Developing personal expertise in strategies that helped them remember pills, swallow pills, quell nausea, and ease diarrhea was both outcome and facilitator. Other essential components of adherence were feeling respected and understood by health care providers, getting prompt and proactive treatment for side effects, and having the financial means to acquire the expensive medications. Active support from family and other intimates, as well as safety and stability in daily environments also made adherence more possible. Wisdom gained from these personal narratives of successful adherence will be applied to practice and policy. Funding: NIH RO1 NR04840, National Institute of Nursing Research and National Institute of Drug Abuse [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleI Take my Pills and Do What I Have to Do: HIV-Infected Women's Successes with Medication Adherenceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160086-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">I Take my Pills and Do What I Have to Do: HIV-Infected Women's Successes with Medication Adherence</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Morton-Miller, Amy, MS, RN, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Graduate Research Assistant</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414/229-5817</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">arm2@uwm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sandra K. Plach, PhD, RN, CCRN, Assistant Professor and Patricia E Stevens, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Highly Active Antiretroviral Treatment (HAART) has been a major breakthrough in the treatment of HIV, but requires strict adherence (as high as 95%) to suppress viral replication and reduce destruction of CD4 cells. In this longitudinal qualitative study, using a feminist narrative approach, we investigated the HAART-related experiences of 55 HIV-infected women who narrated their lives in ten interviews over two years. In this presentation we share findings about women's successes adhering to HAART. Participants were recruited from both urban (75%) and rural (25%) areas. More than half were African American (53%), 36% Caucasian, 7% Hispanic, and 4% Native American. Average age was 41. Average annual income was $10,463 (SD $6902). Eight (14%) had asymptomatic HIV, 28 (51%) symptomatic HIV, and 19 (35%) AIDS. Transcripts were managed using N-vivo computer software. A multi-staged narrative analysis was the primary analytic approach. Results suggest that making a conscious self-commitment to take medications, no matter how much they hated having HIV, was fundamental to individuals' ability to integrate HAART into their lives. Returning to this core of self-determination made it possible to withstand doubts, disturbances, and discomforts entailed in adhering to such difficult regimens. Developing personal expertise in strategies that helped them remember pills, swallow pills, quell nausea, and ease diarrhea was both outcome and facilitator. Other essential components of adherence were feeling respected and understood by health care providers, getting prompt and proactive treatment for side effects, and having the financial means to acquire the expensive medications. Active support from family and other intimates, as well as safety and stability in daily environments also made adherence more possible. Wisdom gained from these personal narratives of successful adherence will be applied to practice and policy. Funding: NIH RO1 NR04840, National Institute of Nursing Research and National Institute of Drug Abuse [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:36:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:36:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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