2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160088
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Lived Experiences of Adult Liver Transplant Recipients
Abstract:
The Lived Experiences of Adult Liver Transplant Recipients
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Newton, Sarah, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Oakland University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 448 O'Dowd Hall, Rochester, MI, 48309, USA
Contact Telephone:(248) 370-4069
Post-liver transplant surgical outcomes are well documented, however, little is known about the lived experience of being an adult liver transplant recipient (ALTR) from the recipients' perspectives. A phenomenological study was undertaken to describe the lived experiences of ALTRs from one Midwestern transplant center who were at least 6 months post-transplant. Data for this secondary analysis came from ALTRs who had participated in Newton's (1997) dissertation project (n=230) and who had responded to the following statement: "If you have any additional thoughts, comments, and/or suggestions that you think would be helpful to this project, we would love to hear from you". Seventy five participants (33%) provided written comments; 18 (24%) had alcohol-related liver disease (ARLD) and 57 (76%) did not. Post-transplant alcohol use was virtually identical for both cohorts, 22% (ARLD) and 21% (non-ARLD). Secondary analysis of the data revealed five clinically-relevant themes: 1) work and financial issues; 2) impact of co-morbidities; 3) happy to be alive; 4) enjoy doing things; 5) life stinks. Two non-clinical themes emerged related to reflections on the study. The clinical themes suggest that liver transplantation, while life-altering, does not necessarily transform one's life in a positive way. Moreover, pre-transplant hepato-toxic behavior, for example, alcohol consumption, did not predict post-transplant hepato-toxic behaviors. Further nursing research is needed to clarify the relationship between the lived experience of receiving a liver transplant and the likelihood of engaging in destructive or non-destructive health behaviors post-transplant.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Lived Experiences of Adult Liver Transplant Recipientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160088-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Lived Experiences of Adult Liver Transplant Recipients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Newton, Sarah, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oakland University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 448 O'Dowd Hall, Rochester, MI, 48309, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(248) 370-4069</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">newton@oakland.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Post-liver transplant surgical outcomes are well documented, however, little is known about the lived experience of being an adult liver transplant recipient (ALTR) from the recipients' perspectives. A phenomenological study was undertaken to describe the lived experiences of ALTRs from one Midwestern transplant center who were at least 6 months post-transplant. Data for this secondary analysis came from ALTRs who had participated in Newton's (1997) dissertation project (n=230) and who had responded to the following statement: &quot;If you have any additional thoughts, comments, and/or suggestions that you think would be helpful to this project, we would love to hear from you&quot;. Seventy five participants (33%) provided written comments; 18 (24%) had alcohol-related liver disease (ARLD) and 57 (76%) did not. Post-transplant alcohol use was virtually identical for both cohorts, 22% (ARLD) and 21% (non-ARLD). Secondary analysis of the data revealed five clinically-relevant themes: 1) work and financial issues; 2) impact of co-morbidities; 3) happy to be alive; 4) enjoy doing things; 5) life stinks. Two non-clinical themes emerged related to reflections on the study. The clinical themes suggest that liver transplantation, while life-altering, does not necessarily transform one's life in a positive way. Moreover, pre-transplant hepato-toxic behavior, for example, alcohol consumption, did not predict post-transplant hepato-toxic behaviors. Further nursing research is needed to clarify the relationship between the lived experience of receiving a liver transplant and the likelihood of engaging in destructive or non-destructive health behaviors post-transplant.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:36:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:36:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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