2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160089
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Lifestyle Practices of Nursing and Health Professions Students
Abstract:
Lifestyle Practices of Nursing and Health Professions Students
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Parker, Karen, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Southern Indiana
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 8600 University Blvd, Evansville, IN, 47712, USA
Contact Telephone:812-461-5214
Co-Authors:Nadine Coudret, EdD, Dean; Jennie Hiam, FNP; Kathy Riedford, DNS; Mayola Rowser, FNP; and Mara Beth Womack, BS
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine lifestyle practices of nursing/health professions students in a college of nursing and health professions (CNHP) as a basis for the development of wellness and health promotion interventions for these health professions students. Conceptual Framework: The curriculum infusion model and social norming theory provided the framework for this study. The effectiveness of social norming in changing high risk lifestyle behaviors has been demonstrated. Subjects: The sample (n=517) consisted of students enrolled in the CNHP. Demographic data was limited to age, gender, program and level of study. Methodology: Following IRB approval, CNHP students voluntarily completed an 18 item researcher-developed survey. The survey questions included dietary habits, weight, exercise, perception of well being, safe sex, and substance use. Instrument reliability and validity were ascertained. Results: SPSS was used to analyze the data. The majority of students were females, age 18-20. While 45% of the students reported being overweight, 38% did not eat well-balanced meals or exercise regularly. Twenty-two percent used tobacco and 8% reported using marijuana or other drugs. The majority (72%) reported alcohol use. Of those surveyed, 68% reported being sexually active; yet 76% did not use condoms consistently. Significant correlations were identified between selected behaviors, type of program, and level of program. Conclusion: Outcomes of this study have implications for nurse educators and supports the need for health promotion interventions for nursing /health professions students. Students need to learn the importance of healthy lifestyle practices for themselves in order to promote the same for their patients. Nurse educator identification of students' lifestyle choices, the development of an intervention program using social norming, and the infusion of healthy lifestyle education into the curriculum will contribute to positive lifestyles changes in their students.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLifestyle Practices of Nursing and Health Professions Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160089-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Lifestyle Practices of Nursing and Health Professions Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Parker, Karen, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Southern Indiana</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 8600 University Blvd, Evansville, IN, 47712, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">812-461-5214</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kparker@usi.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Nadine Coudret, EdD, Dean; Jennie Hiam, FNP; Kathy Riedford, DNS; Mayola Rowser, FNP; and Mara Beth Womack, BS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine lifestyle practices of nursing/health professions students in a college of nursing and health professions (CNHP) as a basis for the development of wellness and health promotion interventions for these health professions students. Conceptual Framework: The curriculum infusion model and social norming theory provided the framework for this study. The effectiveness of social norming in changing high risk lifestyle behaviors has been demonstrated. Subjects: The sample (n=517) consisted of students enrolled in the CNHP. Demographic data was limited to age, gender, program and level of study. Methodology: Following IRB approval, CNHP students voluntarily completed an 18 item researcher-developed survey. The survey questions included dietary habits, weight, exercise, perception of well being, safe sex, and substance use. Instrument reliability and validity were ascertained. Results: SPSS was used to analyze the data. The majority of students were females, age 18-20. While 45% of the students reported being overweight, 38% did not eat well-balanced meals or exercise regularly. Twenty-two percent used tobacco and 8% reported using marijuana or other drugs. The majority (72%) reported alcohol use. Of those surveyed, 68% reported being sexually active; yet 76% did not use condoms consistently. Significant correlations were identified between selected behaviors, type of program, and level of program. Conclusion: Outcomes of this study have implications for nurse educators and supports the need for health promotion interventions for nursing /health professions students. Students need to learn the importance of healthy lifestyle practices for themselves in order to promote the same for their patients. Nurse educator identification of students' lifestyle choices, the development of an intervention program using social norming, and the infusion of healthy lifestyle education into the curriculum will contribute to positive lifestyles changes in their students.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:36:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:36:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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