2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160094
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Fatherhood and the Technological Imperative of the NICU
Abstract:
Fatherhood and the Technological Imperative of the NICU
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Pohlman, Shawn, PhD, MSN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:Maryville University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Health Professions, 843 Heron Woods Drive, Manchester, MO, 63021, USA
Contact Telephone:636-230-9880
As a result of the massive infusion of technology in medicine and nursing over the last several decades, the primacy of pathophysiology has overshadowed the experience of illness. Because nursing is technologically textured, particularly in intensive care units, the technological culture of Western medicine may take precedence over humanistic nursing practice (Walters, 1995). This has important ramifications for neonatal nurses because family centered caregiving is an important goal of their practice. Yet, our understanding of an important member of the familyùthe fatherùis very limited, both at the bedside and within research. Fathers are striving to learn to parent in an environment where technology can literally subsume them. The purpose of this paper is to enhance our understanding of fathering within the highly technological environment of the NICU by giving voice to the fathers themselves. Nine fathers of preterm infants were interviewed over six to seven months, beginning after birth and continuing at home. The narrative text consisted of 63 interviews, which were tape recorded and transcribed verbatim. The philosophical framework for this study is based in interpretive phenomenology, which assumes that humans dwell in a meaningful world. The interviews were analyzed in the interpretive tradition, which involved a systematic, circular process that evolved as my conditional understanding of fathers' actions and lives deepened from numerous readings and narrative interpretations. Findings will be presented within three themes: (1) the consequences of the technological imperative on nursing practices; (2) the power differential between fathers and nurses; and (3) fathering despite the technological stance of health care. If we are to provide real and meaningful family centered caregiving beyond rhetoric, it is imperative that we better understand fathering in this technologic environment. Although fathers often remain quiet about their thoughts and feelings, some are watching us quite closely.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFatherhood and the Technological Imperative of the NICUen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160094-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Fatherhood and the Technological Imperative of the NICU</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pohlman, Shawn, PhD, MSN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Maryville University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Health Professions, 843 Heron Woods Drive, Manchester, MO, 63021, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">636-230-9880</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">spohlman@maryville.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">As a result of the massive infusion of technology in medicine and nursing over the last several decades, the primacy of pathophysiology has overshadowed the experience of illness. Because nursing is technologically textured, particularly in intensive care units, the technological culture of Western medicine may take precedence over humanistic nursing practice (Walters, 1995). This has important ramifications for neonatal nurses because family centered caregiving is an important goal of their practice. Yet, our understanding of an important member of the family&ugrave;the father&ugrave;is very limited, both at the bedside and within research. Fathers are striving to learn to parent in an environment where technology can literally subsume them. The purpose of this paper is to enhance our understanding of fathering within the highly technological environment of the NICU by giving voice to the fathers themselves. Nine fathers of preterm infants were interviewed over six to seven months, beginning after birth and continuing at home. The narrative text consisted of 63 interviews, which were tape recorded and transcribed verbatim. The philosophical framework for this study is based in interpretive phenomenology, which assumes that humans dwell in a meaningful world. The interviews were analyzed in the interpretive tradition, which involved a systematic, circular process that evolved as my conditional understanding of fathers' actions and lives deepened from numerous readings and narrative interpretations. Findings will be presented within three themes: (1) the consequences of the technological imperative on nursing practices; (2) the power differential between fathers and nurses; and (3) fathering despite the technological stance of health care. If we are to provide real and meaningful family centered caregiving beyond rhetoric, it is imperative that we better understand fathering in this technologic environment. Although fathers often remain quiet about their thoughts and feelings, some are watching us quite closely.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:37:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:37:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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