2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160095
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Death in the ICU: Viewpoints of ICU Nurses
Abstract:
Death in the ICU: Viewpoints of ICU Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Popejoy, Lori, PhD(c), APRN, CS, GCNS
P.I. Institution Name:Boone Hospital Center
Title:Research Coordinator
Contact Address:Nursing Research Division, 1600 East Broadway, Columbia, MO, 65201, USA
Contact Telephone:573-815-8428
Co-Authors:Lea C. Brandt, OTR, Manager
Intensive Care Unit (ICU) nurses play a pivotal role in providing and organizing care for critically ill and/or dying patients and their families. This role gives ICU nurses a unique perspective about end-of-life care and decision-making. As part of a larger formative evaluation project to integrate palliative care into ICUs, focus groups comprised of 22 nurses from Medical, Surgical, and Neuroscience ICUs were convened to elucidate their perspective on the care of dying patients and the use of palliative care in the ICU. Data were analyzed across five focus groups using thematic analysis. The identified themes include a) helping the patient through, b) telling bad news, c) grieving as a process, d) family as patient, e) effects of caring for dying patients on the nurse, and f) defining palliative care from the nurse's perspective. Identification of these themes provides valuable insight into the ethical conflicts associated with caring for critically ill and/or dying patients. Issues that were significant for the nurses included a) the importance of communication between patients, families, nurses, and physicians; b) the problems conflicts in truth-telling create between nurses and physicians; and c) the moral distress created in ICU nurses when death becomes an orchestrated process.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeath in the ICU: Viewpoints of ICU Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160095-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Death in the ICU: Viewpoints of ICU Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Popejoy, Lori, PhD(c), APRN, CS, GCNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Boone Hospital Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Research Division, 1600 East Broadway, Columbia, MO, 65201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">573-815-8428</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">popejoyl@bjc.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lea C. Brandt, OTR, Manager</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Intensive Care Unit (ICU) nurses play a pivotal role in providing and organizing care for critically ill and/or dying patients and their families. This role gives ICU nurses a unique perspective about end-of-life care and decision-making. As part of a larger formative evaluation project to integrate palliative care into ICUs, focus groups comprised of 22 nurses from Medical, Surgical, and Neuroscience ICUs were convened to elucidate their perspective on the care of dying patients and the use of palliative care in the ICU. Data were analyzed across five focus groups using thematic analysis. The identified themes include a) helping the patient through, b) telling bad news, c) grieving as a process, d) family as patient, e) effects of caring for dying patients on the nurse, and f) defining palliative care from the nurse's perspective. Identification of these themes provides valuable insight into the ethical conflicts associated with caring for critically ill and/or dying patients. Issues that were significant for the nurses included a) the importance of communication between patients, families, nurses, and physicians; b) the problems conflicts in truth-telling create between nurses and physicians; and c) the moral distress created in ICU nurses when death becomes an orchestrated process.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:37:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:37:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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