2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160100
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Worries among HIV-positive pregnant women in Thailand
Abstract:
Worries among HIV-positive pregnant women in Thailand
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Ross, Ratchneewan, PhD, MSc, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Kent State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, PO BOX 5190, Kent, OH, 44242, USA
Contact Telephone:330-672-8785
Co-Authors:Pakvilai Srisaeng, PhD, RN, Instructor; Wilaiphan Sawatphanit, MSN, BscN, Assistant Professor; and Claire B. Draucker, PhD, RN, CS, Professor
Background: Living with HIV is stressful. Stress from worries has been linked to lower immune functions, which can lead to faster disease progression and lower quality of life among seropositive individuals.

Purpose: to examine worries among HIV-infected pregnant Thai women.

Subjects and Method: Secondary analysis was used on an existing data set to answer the research question. The main study included 127 HIV-positive pregnant women who completed a questionnaire packet at the prenatal clinic of four hospitals in Thailand. The purpose of the main study was to examine predictors of depression among these women. An open-ended question that asked participants about their worries related to HIV was included in the questionnaire, and the participants' responses were examined with content analysis.

Results: The participants' ages ranged from 16 to 41 years old. Fifty-three percent were first-time mothers. Seventy percent of all participants identified worries they had concerning their infection. Content analysis revealed five categories of worries: mother-to-child transmission (34.2%), stigmatization (26.2%), death (23.5%), hurting parents' feelings (6.7%), and spreading the virus to others (4.1%). Despite being aware of the effectiveness of their antiretrovirals, many participants were apprehensive about the possibility of spreading the virus to their unborn child. They were afraid that friends and family would reject them after learning of their infection. Thoughts about future progression to AIDS and death were additional worries. Several participants stated that they were too young to die. Some considered it a sin to hurt their parents' feelings by disclosing their HIV status to them. The participants were also concerned that they might spread the virus to their loved ones by chance.

Conclusions: The participants identified five major worries. The most frequent worry was spreading the virus to their unborn child. Nursing interventions should be tailored to seropositive pregnant women's worries. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWorries among HIV-positive pregnant women in Thailanden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160100-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Worries among HIV-positive pregnant women in Thailand</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ross, Ratchneewan, PhD, MSc, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kent State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, PO BOX 5190, Kent, OH, 44242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330-672-8785</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rross1@kent.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Pakvilai Srisaeng, PhD, RN, Instructor; Wilaiphan Sawatphanit, MSN, BscN, Assistant Professor; and Claire B. Draucker, PhD, RN, CS, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Living with HIV is stressful. Stress from worries has been linked to lower immune functions, which can lead to faster disease progression and lower quality of life among seropositive individuals. <br/><br/>Purpose: to examine worries among HIV-infected pregnant Thai women. <br/><br/>Subjects and Method: Secondary analysis was used on an existing data set to answer the research question. The main study included 127 HIV-positive pregnant women who completed a questionnaire packet at the prenatal clinic of four hospitals in Thailand. The purpose of the main study was to examine predictors of depression among these women. An open-ended question that asked participants about their worries related to HIV was included in the questionnaire, and the participants' responses were examined with content analysis. <br/><br/>Results: The participants' ages ranged from 16 to 41 years old. Fifty-three percent were first-time mothers. Seventy percent of all participants identified worries they had concerning their infection. Content analysis revealed five categories of worries: mother-to-child transmission (34.2%), stigmatization (26.2%), death (23.5%), hurting parents' feelings (6.7%), and spreading the virus to others (4.1%). Despite being aware of the effectiveness of their antiretrovirals, many participants were apprehensive about the possibility of spreading the virus to their unborn child. They were afraid that friends and family would reject them after learning of their infection. Thoughts about future progression to AIDS and death were additional worries. Several participants stated that they were too young to die. Some considered it a sin to hurt their parents' feelings by disclosing their HIV status to them. The participants were also concerned that they might spread the virus to their loved ones by chance.<br/><br/>Conclusions: The participants identified five major worries. The most frequent worry was spreading the virus to their unborn child. Nursing interventions should be tailored to seropositive pregnant women's worries. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:37:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:37:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.