2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160101
Type:
Presentation
Title:
STI-related correlates of sexual risk-taking among high school students
Abstract:
STI-related correlates of sexual risk-taking among high school students
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Royer, Heather, MS, APRN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin - Madison
Title:Predoctoral Student
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792, USA
Contact Telephone:608-263-9040
Co-Authors:Jenny Lujan, RN, Public Health Nurse; Jennifer Daniel, MPH, Biostatistician; and Mary Keller, PhD, RN, Professor
Adolescents have the highest prevalence of risky sexual activities and sexually transmitted infections. Various theories of health behavior posit that risky sexual activities are linked to general knowledge of STIs and perceptions of disease susceptibility. Missing from these theories is recognition of the roles of a) specific knowledge regarding symptoms and transmission of STIs and b) concrete experience with susceptibility in the form of prior testing for an STI. The major purpose of this investigation was to examine whether sexual risk-taking differed by specific knowledge regarding STIs, perceived susceptibility to STIs or, concrete experience with STI testing. A descriptive, correlational design was employed. Participants were 15,650 high school students living in a Midwestern County. They were approximately equally distributed by gender, age and year in school. The majority (78%) were Caucasian. Students completed a Youth Risk Behavior Survey containing about 200 questions covering many topics. This survey is conducted every four years to evaluate the health of youth and identify targets for intervention. Questions regarding sexual behavior and STIs were drawn from CDC questionnaires and used in prior surveys or designed by the authors. Two-thirds of the students reported that they had never had sexual intercourse. Among those who reported sexual intercourse, the most common ages of onset were 15 or 16, and the most common number of partners was 1 or 2. Participants were somewhat accurate in their specific knowledge of STIs (M = 4.1 of possible 6) and evaluated their susceptibility to the infections as low (M =0.15 of possible 2). 11.5% had been tested for the presence of an STI. In general, sexual risk taking was linked to specific knowledge about STI symptoms and transmission, perceived susceptibility, and concrete experience with testing. Interventions focusing on these specific dimensions should be tested for their impact on sexual behavior.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSTI-related correlates of sexual risk-taking among high school studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160101-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">STI-related correlates of sexual risk-taking among high school students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Royer, Heather, MS, APRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin - Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Predoctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608-263-9040</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hroyer@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jenny Lujan, RN, Public Health Nurse; Jennifer Daniel, MPH, Biostatistician; and Mary Keller, PhD, RN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Adolescents have the highest prevalence of risky sexual activities and sexually transmitted infections. Various theories of health behavior posit that risky sexual activities are linked to general knowledge of STIs and perceptions of disease susceptibility. Missing from these theories is recognition of the roles of a) specific knowledge regarding symptoms and transmission of STIs and b) concrete experience with susceptibility in the form of prior testing for an STI. The major purpose of this investigation was to examine whether sexual risk-taking differed by specific knowledge regarding STIs, perceived susceptibility to STIs or, concrete experience with STI testing. A descriptive, correlational design was employed. Participants were 15,650 high school students living in a Midwestern County. They were approximately equally distributed by gender, age and year in school. The majority (78%) were Caucasian. Students completed a Youth Risk Behavior Survey containing about 200 questions covering many topics. This survey is conducted every four years to evaluate the health of youth and identify targets for intervention. Questions regarding sexual behavior and STIs were drawn from CDC questionnaires and used in prior surveys or designed by the authors. Two-thirds of the students reported that they had never had sexual intercourse. Among those who reported sexual intercourse, the most common ages of onset were 15 or 16, and the most common number of partners was 1 or 2. Participants were somewhat accurate in their specific knowledge of STIs (M = 4.1 of possible 6) and evaluated their susceptibility to the infections as low (M =0.15 of possible 2). 11.5% had been tested for the presence of an STI. In general, sexual risk taking was linked to specific knowledge about STI symptoms and transmission, perceived susceptibility, and concrete experience with testing. Interventions focusing on these specific dimensions should be tested for their impact on sexual behavior.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:37:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:37:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.