2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160102
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measurement of Functional Status in the Spinal Cord Injured Patient
Abstract:
Measurement of Functional Status in the Spinal Cord Injured Patient
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Sander, Rita, PhD(c), RN
P.I. Institution Name:Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Box 1066, Edwardsville, IL, 62265, USA
Contact Telephone:618-588-4834
There was little published literature relating to the reliability and validity of the Modified Functional Independence Measure (FIM). Yet, this tool is used nationwide to measure outcome in trauma care. This was a secondary analysis of archival data that examined the psychometric characteristics of the Modified Functional Independence Measure. Traumatic spinal cord injury irreversibly alters a person's functional status, physically and psychologically. This study focused on physical functional status. The Roy adaptation model and Nagi's theory of disablement provided the conceptual framework to guide this methodological study. The Modified FIM is an instrument comprised of 3 items (feeding, locomotion, and expression) using a 4-point ordinal rating scale. The sample was the Missouri Department of Health archival data of 782 spinal cord injured (SCI) trauma patients (both male and female) based on International Classification Code Diagnoses (version 9) discharged from January 1, 1995 to December 31, 1999. The age evaluated was 18 to 90 years of age. Tetraplegia was present in 38% and paraplegia in 62%. The internal consistency of the Modified FIM demonstrated a moderate Cronbach's alpha .69 (n=782). An independent t-test comparing the mean scores of subjects with tetraplegia to paraplegia found a significant difference between the means of the two groups. The construct validity using a "known groups" approach with an independent t-test was found to be significant [t (782) = - 3.3, p<.001 (2 - tail test)] discriminating between patients with tetraplegia versus paraplegia. The mean of the subjects with tetraplegia was lower (M =9.4, SD = 2.7) than the subjects with paraplegia (M =10, SD = 2.1). This study supports a significant relationship between the Modified FIM and length of hospital/intensive care unit stay, the Injury Severity Score, and has prognostic implications for nursing practice and assessing discharge planning in these severely injured patients.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasurement of Functional Status in the Spinal Cord Injured Patienten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160102-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Measurement of Functional Status in the Spinal Cord Injured Patient</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sander, Rita, PhD(c), RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Southern Illinois University Edwardsville</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Box 1066, Edwardsville, IL, 62265, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">618-588-4834</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rsander@siue.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">There was little published literature relating to the reliability and validity of the Modified Functional Independence Measure (FIM). Yet, this tool is used nationwide to measure outcome in trauma care. This was a secondary analysis of archival data that examined the psychometric characteristics of the Modified Functional Independence Measure. Traumatic spinal cord injury irreversibly alters a person's functional status, physically and psychologically. This study focused on physical functional status. The Roy adaptation model and Nagi's theory of disablement provided the conceptual framework to guide this methodological study. The Modified FIM is an instrument comprised of 3 items (feeding, locomotion, and expression) using a 4-point ordinal rating scale. The sample was the Missouri Department of Health archival data of 782 spinal cord injured (SCI) trauma patients (both male and female) based on International Classification Code Diagnoses (version 9) discharged from January 1, 1995 to December 31, 1999. The age evaluated was 18 to 90 years of age. Tetraplegia was present in 38% and paraplegia in 62%. The internal consistency of the Modified FIM demonstrated a moderate Cronbach's alpha .69 (n=782). An independent t-test comparing the mean scores of subjects with tetraplegia to paraplegia found a significant difference between the means of the two groups. The construct validity using a &quot;known groups&quot; approach with an independent t-test was found to be significant [t (782) = - 3.3, p&lt;.001 (2 - tail test)] discriminating between patients with tetraplegia versus paraplegia. The mean of the subjects with tetraplegia was lower (M =9.4, SD = 2.7) than the subjects with paraplegia (M =10, SD = 2.1). This study supports a significant relationship between the Modified FIM and length of hospital/intensive care unit stay, the Injury Severity Score, and has prognostic implications for nursing practice and assessing discharge planning in these severely injured patients.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:37:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:37:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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