2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160103
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Making the Journey Safe: How Families Promote the Safety of Young Drivers
Abstract:
Making the Journey Safe: How Families Promote the Safety of Young Drivers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Sappington, Julie, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Southeast Missouri State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, P.O. Box 316, Jackson, MO, 63755, USA
Contact Telephone:573-450-9268
Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for persons aged 15 to 19. Although parents are the primary teachers of driving skills, little is known about the everyday experiences of parents and teenagers as the process of learning to drive unfolds. This interpretive phenomenological study examined the experience of learning to drive from the perspective of teenagers and mothers and explored how learning was shaped by family practices and community and cultural influences. The study design consisted of six interviews with eight mother-teen dyads from rural communities over a four month period. Teens and mothers were interviewed separately. The first interview took place within four months of the teenagers' initial licensure.

Study findings indicated that driving was recognized as a rite of passage into adulthood. Although most mothers handled this transition well, the challenge of accepting a teen's impending adulthood and safety concerns led to conflict between mothers and teenagers in a few families.

The busy, hurried culture in which we live shaped the driving experience of teens. Allowing teenagers time to practice driving was essential to the development of needed skills and judgment, but work and community commitments made it difficult for some parents to find time for teenagers to drive.

Mothers sometimes found it challenging to remain calm and composed during driving practice and expressions of fearful, embodied responses also affected the learning experience.

Study findings regarding teens' gradual progression of skill development support the need for parent education that emphasizes the manner in which teens acquire skills and provides information on the characteristics of each stage of skill acquisition. This knowledge is vital as the mothers' ability to tailor the teaching approach to meet safety and learning needs at various levels of skill acquisition was a key factor to a successful learning experience.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaking the Journey Safe: How Families Promote the Safety of Young Driversen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160103-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Making the Journey Safe: How Families Promote the Safety of Young Drivers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sappington, Julie, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Southeast Missouri State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, P.O. Box 316, Jackson, MO, 63755, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">573-450-9268</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">julesy_42@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for persons aged 15 to 19. Although parents are the primary teachers of driving skills, little is known about the everyday experiences of parents and teenagers as the process of learning to drive unfolds. This interpretive phenomenological study examined the experience of learning to drive from the perspective of teenagers and mothers and explored how learning was shaped by family practices and community and cultural influences. The study design consisted of six interviews with eight mother-teen dyads from rural communities over a four month period. Teens and mothers were interviewed separately. The first interview took place within four months of the teenagers' initial licensure. <br/><br/>Study findings indicated that driving was recognized as a rite of passage into adulthood. Although most mothers handled this transition well, the challenge of accepting a teen's impending adulthood and safety concerns led to conflict between mothers and teenagers in a few families. <br/><br/>The busy, hurried culture in which we live shaped the driving experience of teens. Allowing teenagers time to practice driving was essential to the development of needed skills and judgment, but work and community commitments made it difficult for some parents to find time for teenagers to drive.<br/><br/>Mothers sometimes found it challenging to remain calm and composed during driving practice and expressions of fearful, embodied responses also affected the learning experience. <br/><br/>Study findings regarding teens' gradual progression of skill development support the need for parent education that emphasizes the manner in which teens acquire skills and provides information on the characteristics of each stage of skill acquisition. This knowledge is vital as the mothers' ability to tailor the teaching approach to meet safety and learning needs at various levels of skill acquisition was a key factor to a successful learning experience.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:37:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:37:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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