2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160104
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self-Care Agency Development in Children with Type 1 Diabetes
Abstract:
Self-Care Agency Development in Children with Type 1 Diabetes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Schmidt, Cynthia, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Box 1066, Edwardsville, IL, 62026, USA
Contact Telephone:618-650-3921
Co-Authors:Sheila Pietroburgo, MS, RN, Instructor
Nurses play a crucial role in assisting children and their families to manage the complex requirements related to type 1 diabetes. Little is known, however, about how these children develop the powers to engage in the daily activities required to maintain health. The purpose of this study was to evaluate self-care agency development in children with type 1 diabetes. Mothers were chosen as informants, as the literature indicates they are the major caretakers of children's diabetes-related requirements and are reliable informants of their children's perceptions. Orem's (2001) theory provided the framework for this study. Based upon the literature and preliminary qualitative data by this author, an 84-item survey was developed and mailed to two hundred mothers of children with type 1 diabetes receiving care at a major Midwestern children's hospital; eighty-eight mothers responded. Using descriptive and inferential statistics, data indicated children demonstrated higher levels of self-care activities, independence, precision, and ability to manage abnormal blood glucose levels with increasing age. As children approached junior high age, they often felt angry and/or different from peers, or felt that diabetes was disruptive to their lifestyle. Girls learned skills earlier and were more independent in diabetes-related self-care than boys, yet had more difficulty in adhering to dietary requirements. Almost one-fourth of the children had fabricated or falsified blood glucose levels for a period of time. Ninety-seven percent of mothers reported that their children were motivated to adhere to requirements because they "felt better" when blood glucose levels were in a "good" range. The final item on the survey invited mothers to write thoughts and feelings they felt were not adequately addressed in the survey items or which addressed personal concerns. Six common themes were identified: frustration, fear, worry, increased diabetes-related conflicts during teen years, complexity of skill requirement, and benefits of diabetes camps.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf-Care Agency Development in Children with Type 1 Diabetesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160104-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Self-Care Agency Development in Children with Type 1 Diabetes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schmidt, Cynthia, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Southern Illinois University Edwardsville</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Box 1066, Edwardsville, IL, 62026, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">618-650-3921</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">caschmi@siue.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sheila Pietroburgo, MS, RN, Instructor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nurses play a crucial role in assisting children and their families to manage the complex requirements related to type 1 diabetes. Little is known, however, about how these children develop the powers to engage in the daily activities required to maintain health. The purpose of this study was to evaluate self-care agency development in children with type 1 diabetes. Mothers were chosen as informants, as the literature indicates they are the major caretakers of children's diabetes-related requirements and are reliable informants of their children's perceptions. Orem's (2001) theory provided the framework for this study. Based upon the literature and preliminary qualitative data by this author, an 84-item survey was developed and mailed to two hundred mothers of children with type 1 diabetes receiving care at a major Midwestern children's hospital; eighty-eight mothers responded. Using descriptive and inferential statistics, data indicated children demonstrated higher levels of self-care activities, independence, precision, and ability to manage abnormal blood glucose levels with increasing age. As children approached junior high age, they often felt angry and/or different from peers, or felt that diabetes was disruptive to their lifestyle. Girls learned skills earlier and were more independent in diabetes-related self-care than boys, yet had more difficulty in adhering to dietary requirements. Almost one-fourth of the children had fabricated or falsified blood glucose levels for a period of time. Ninety-seven percent of mothers reported that their children were motivated to adhere to requirements because they &quot;felt better&quot; when blood glucose levels were in a &quot;good&quot; range. The final item on the survey invited mothers to write thoughts and feelings they felt were not adequately addressed in the survey items or which addressed personal concerns. Six common themes were identified: frustration, fear, worry, increased diabetes-related conflicts during teen years, complexity of skill requirement, and benefits of diabetes camps.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:37:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:37:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.